cater for human behavior

alice

Member
France, French English Spanish Irish
"it does not really cater for human behavior in term of time"

should I understand "it doesn't really take into account human behavior in term of time"?

thanks, Alice
 
  • alice

    Member
    France, French English Spanish Irish
    it's about a model for evacuation simulation.

    the whole sentence is:

    "in the writer's opinion it only deals with part of the problem, seeing it does not really cater for human behavior in term of time. human behaviors such as perception of cues or [...] are not really included."
     

    Axl

    Senior Member
    England, English
    Bonjour, Alice.

    IMHO, your initial reading was correct: "it doesn't really take into account human behavior in term of time". Jabote was right in saying that provide for means cater for. But in this particular case, this would be a loose and confusing use of provide for, i.e. to take into account.
    I think the last four words should be in terms of time - the fact that they aren't is probably due to a typo or bad use of English. In this context I should think he means the time it takes to carry out the evacuation and to recognise the signals and gestures (cues as he puts it) of the people carrying it out.

    Whatever, the sentence does not seem to be particularly well written, IMHO.
    If you want, I'll have a go at paraphrasing it, if you think it might help...
     

    lainyn

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    A paraphrase:

    It does not really consider (or take into account) human behaviour in terms of time. (So your original interpretation was quite good!)

    That's really quite terrible English :( , by the way. I've never heard the phrasal verb "cater for" before, only "cater to" which has a different meaning entirely. I think translating would be a lot easier if people wrote properly in the source language! :)
     

    alice

    Member
    France, French English Spanish Irish
    well, the author isn't English but Australian. that might explain this "quite terrible English"...

    anyway, thanks a lot for your help!

    Alice
     

    Axl

    Senior Member
    England, English
    alice said:
    well, the author isn't English but Australian. that might explain this "quite terrible English"...
    anyway, thanks a lot for your help!
    That explains it perfectly, Alice.:D They might thrash us Pommies at cricket, but...
     

    lainyn

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Heh,

    I knew that Australians had a different vocabulary, but I'm still surprised that this sort of phrasal verb would show up, to me it doesn't make grammatical sense. Well, you learn something new every day!
     

    Axl

    Senior Member
    England, English
    lainyn said:
    Heh,

    I knew that Australians had a different vocabulary, but I'm still surprised that this sort of phrasal verb would show up, to me it doesn't make grammatical sense. Well, you learn something new every day!
    I was just kidding.;) The difference between Australian-English is as trifling as the difference between American- and British-English. In fact, there are probably even fewer differences. And most English people understand those subtle differences perfectly in any case having been brought up on Neighbours!
    His poor use of English has nothing to do with him being Australian. I suppose English-speakers everywhere write and speak poorly. He must just be one of them!:)

    Axl.
     

    alice

    Member
    France, French English Spanish Irish
    His name doesn't sound Australian (MacLennan) but he's working at a National Institute of Technology in Autralia.
    To be honest almost all sentences from his report are pretty long. It just takes time to understand what he means...

    I'm sure my reports would be the same if I hadn't my nice housemates to correct my English at the end... :)

    Alice
     

    Axl

    Senior Member
    England, English
    alice said:
    His name doesn't sound Australian (MacLennan) but he's working at a National Institute of Technology in Autralia.
    To be honest almost all sentences from his report are pretty long. It just takes time to understand what he means...

    I'm sure my reports would be the same if I hadn't my nice housemates to correct my English at the end... :)

    Alice
    Ah, but English is your second/third/fourth language! Phew, you speak Gaelic?

    What is an Australian name?:) The vast majority of them were British convicts (at first, and far fewer than we like to think!) then settlers (in larger numbers than we often like to think!).
    If he is Australian, I would bet he was a Glaswegian emigrant in 1879. Don't know why!:D

    Axl.
     

    mandabear

    New Member
    Australia English
    Hello there,

    I am Australian. I am afraid you are wrong in many cases. First of all, I don't consider the phrase grammatically correct (and I would take more care with the author's I pay attention to if I were you). Secondly, McLaggen is a common name - Australia is a multicultural country and has a so many different names that you are being naive if you think you can judge who is Australian by their surname. You'll find just as many Scottish surnames here as you will find Chinese!

    Finally, if we Australians were any good at cricket, we would have one the ashes - wouldn't we?

    Please be fairer to my country.
     
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