cats discrimination

ipipip

Senior Member
Mandarin Chinese普通话
Hi, guys. I don't know which one is right 'cat discrimination' , 'discrimination of cats' or 'discrimination to cats'?


He showed great discrimination in his choice of friends. The sentence is from some dictionary, so maybe I should say discrimination in cats.


I find an article on Google in which author used 'cat discrimination'.


Which one is correct?
Thanks a lot.
 
  • Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I find an article on Google in which author used 'cat discrimination'.
    Your blog entry appears to be written by a non-native speaker of English. This phrase only appears as the title and I don't think it describes what the blog entry is about. The word "discrimination" is used incorrectly several times in the blog entry. Can you give us your own sentence in which you would like to use this term and explain what you want to say?
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    ipipip,
    Please include some context, not just a link:
    Apparently, cat’s are discriminated by people based off of the color of their fur, just as people are discriminated by other people based on their skin color.
    You will see that the article is filled with errors. See the red font.

    Cat discrimination: this is two nouns with the first noun acting as a qualifier of the second noun. = the discrimination that is associated with the domestic cat family.
    Cat's discrimination: this is the genitive: = The discrimination possessed by cats.

    discrimination of cats': this is wrong. There is no apostrophe.

    As 0hisa2me remarks, you need to say which meaning interests you.
     
    Last edited:

    ipipip

    Senior Member
    Mandarin Chinese普通话
    Sorry, I didn't just say clearly.


    Do you mean 'discrimination' in the sense of 'fine understanding' or 'unfair treatment or rejection'?
    I want to say a kind of ability to discern or to distinguish what kind of class a cat belongs to.






    Can you give us your own sentence in which you would like to use this term and explain what you want to say?
    In fact, I'm puzzled which word I should choose to emphasize 'the ability'. 'discernment' or 'discrimination'?




    Cat discrimination: this is two nouns with the first noun acting as a qualifier of the second noun. = the discrimonation that is associated with the domestic cat family.
    Thank you. If I describe some one is an expert on cats, and can recognize a domestic cat's class in quite similar cats by a glance, saying out scientific name, could I say the one has a great cat discrimination?


     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Well, you can put practically any two nouns together and the combination could have some meaning in context. You could call this 'cat discrimination', but it sounds odd. (And not just because the other meaning, as in 'race and sex discrimination', is interfering with it.) Perhaps 'discrimination of cats' might be better, or even 'discrimination among(st) cats'. These are what we say in more common situations such as discrimination of odours or flavours. (We can also talk about odour/flavour discrimination, where the unfair preference meaning is unlikely.)
     

    Sparky Malarky

    Moderator
    English - US
    Apparently, cat’s are discriminated by people based off of the color of their fur, just as people are discriminated by other people based on their skin color.

    If I were to correct this sentence it would be:

    Apparently, cats are discriminated against by people based on the color of their fur, just as people are discriminated against by other people based on their skin color.
     
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