Causative clauses, get/have

gabbsgou

Senior Member
spanish-Venezuela
He leído en varios sitios que el uso de get y have es practicamente lo mismo, y hasta más formal el uso de uno que otro.
Pero luego escuché que "have" es cuando le pagas a alguien para hacer algo, y cuando usas "get" es para convencer.

Por ejemplo:

I will have the mechanic paint my car (le pagaré para que lo haga)
I will get my sister to do the laundry (la convenceré para que lo haga)

¿Qué tan de cierto es esto?
 
  • Sprachliebhaber

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Creo que no es necesario que pagues, solo que puedes mandar (por ejemplo sargento y soldado raso, capataz y subordinado)

    Por supuesto, aquí hablamos de "get" y "have" solamente en este contexto; en sus otros sentidos pueden ser muy diferentes.
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    I would say that "get" implies more persuasion. That is, you have to work harder because the other person doesn't want to do it. Or, it could imply deceit (tricking the other person).

    "Have" is much more neutral. You did something that resulted in the other person's doing something.
     

    Sprachliebhaber

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Estoy de acuerdo con gengo. Es verdad que no hay un diferencia gramática entre los verbos, pero de sentido, sí. No diríamos "I'll have my sister do my laundry", porque no puedo mandar que lo haga y necesito persuadirla: "get" lo sugiere. No diríamos "I'll get the mechanic to paint my car", porque lo pagaré para pintarlo: entonces "have".
     

    Trailbosstom

    Senior Member
    American English
    I remember interviewing for a job. When I heard that the students were required to write a research paper, I said, "Oh, so you make them write a research paper."
    The woman interviewing me frowned in disapproval. "We HAVE them write a research paper," said said unpleasantly.
    (I didn't get the job, by the way.)

    "Have someone do something" is a milder way of saying "get someone to do something." "Make" is even stronger:
    "Apologize!"
    "Make me!" (a challenge)
    Remember have, make, and let use the "to-less infinitive" while with "get" you must use the particle "to."
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    (I didn't get the job, by the way.)
    Heheh. I once interviewed for a job and learned that the interviewer was the tenant of the condo I had just purchased, and therefore I was causing him to be evicted. Needless to say, I didn't get that job, either.

    Remember have, make, and let use the "to-less infinitive" while with "get" you must use the particle "to."
    Good point. And BTW, that's called the bare infinitive.

    It may also be confusing to non-native speakers because "get" can have a positive and very different meaning.

    Ex.
    -Did you have to read that book?
    -Have to? I got to read it. It's an amazing book.

    In this case, "get" implies that you were allowed to do something pleasant, while "have" implies that you were forced to do something unpleasant.
     

    Trailbosstom

    Senior Member
    American English
    Yes, but aren't those are two different kinds of get?
    1. The mayor will be at the party. I hope I get to meet him.
    2. The mayor will be at the party. I hope I can get him to lend me money.

    Bette Azar who made a zillion on her ESL grammar books used to use "too-less" I think.
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    Yes, but aren't those two different kinds of get?
    Indeed they are. I just said that it probably makes it confusing for people learning English.

    Bette Azar who made a zillion on her ESL grammar books used to use "too-less" I think.
    On this forum it's helpful to use the terms that seem to be more common, and bare infinitive is commonly mentioned here. It seems more straightforward to me than "to-less infinitive." (Hey, it confused even you, making you spell it as too-less. ;))
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    Having someone do something is requesting, paying, or convincing them to do it.
    Getting someone to do something is the same, but with a little more effort and with more of a goal of getting whatever-it-is completed.
     
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