cause à mon cul ma tête est malade

  • livvie

    Senior Member
    Gibraltar, English
    Shut up!

    Stop talking, you're giving me a headache.

    Stop talking/shut up, you're doing my head in.

    All the above are quite informal :)
     

    toniosky

    Senior Member
    France, French
    "Cause à mon cul ma tête est malade" DOES NOT mean 'Don't bother me, I'm not feeling well (or I don't want to talk to you!)'.

    It is used when someone is not listening to you, to your advice.

     

    Eric75

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    Toniosky is right: there is a misunderstandng about the meaning of the sentence.
    " Cause à mon cul ma tête est malade ", is said (sometimes to oneself) by someone who said something to somebody else but was not listened to.
     

    tilt

    Senior Member
    French French
    So it's like "in one ear, out the other", then?

    Or is it an ironic statement about the value of one's opinion, used when that opinion has not been heeded?
    This expression doesn't only mean I'm not listening to you, but I do not want to listen to you, just like you said in message #2.
     

    Eric75

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    So it's like "in one ear, out the other", then?
    I would say so. That' the meaning, but I'm not sure you use that expression in the same context, i.e in a dialog.

    Or is it an ironic statement about the value of one's opinion, used when that opinion has not been heeded?
    No, it's not : the one that speaks sees that the other does not listen/care, and says "loud to himself", so that the other can hear it " C'est ça, parle à mon cul (ma tête est malade) ... "

    ...but writing that down I now have a doubt: there may be a difference between " parle à mon cul " and " parle à mon cul, ma tête est malade ". My slang French is here not good enough to be sure of that...
     

    WindDust

    Senior Member
    France
    So it's like "in one ear, out the other", then?

    Or is it an ironic statement about the value of one's opinion, used when that opinion has not been heeded?
    This expression also exists in french : "ça rentre part une oreille, ça ressort dans l'autre"
    meaning that it has been heard but will probably not be remembered!

    Whereas the sentence here is used if Mr.A speaks to Mr.B and Mr.B is not listening then Mr.A will say "parle à mon cul ..." meaning that Mr.A realises that he would have better talked to Mr.B's ass since his head seems sick


    Edit
    I don't know why I bother; I might as well talk to a brick wall.
    Yes this sounds like the appropriate one :D
     

    doodlebugger

    Senior Member
    France
    This expression also exists in french : "ça rentre part une oreille, ça ressort dans l'autre"
    meaning that it has been heard but will probably not be remembered!

    Rather: ça rentre dans une oreille et ça ressort par l'autre.

    As for parle à mon cul, it always reminds me of the famous quote from Sacha Guitry (I believe) replying to a critic:
    Monsieur, j'ai lu votre critique d'une fesse distraite.
     

    Dossusa

    New Member
    english
    I do not mean to be rude or offend anyone...please know that my mother is French and came to this country and taught herself how to speak English. I was raised here in VA. She used to tell me when I ignored her as a teenager this saying, and translated it is...Speak to my ass, my head is sick.
     

    Embonpoint

    Senior Member
    English--American
    Thank you to doodlebugger for that awesome Guitry quote.

    Keith Bradford's "I might as well be talking to a brick wall" translation is perfect. A few other options:

    I'm wasting my breath.
    I might as well be talking to myself.
     

    orpheu48

    New Member
    français
    I'm a frenchman.
    As Y use that expression, it also means 'I will not even try to listen to what you are saying, because it does not interest me at all: yo are talking nonsense
    *.
     

    Aristide

    Senior Member
    france, french
    "cause à mon cul ma tête est malade"

    La première fois que j'ai entendu cette phrase, c'était dans la bouche de Robert Redford, mais j'ai oublié quel film c'était.

    À l'époque, j'ai trouvé que c'était une mauvaise traduction, car ce n'est pas le genre de choses qu'on dirait en français. Ceux qui ont traduit les dialogues du film on peut-être fait une traduction littérale. En tout cas, c'est ce film qui a répandu l'expression dans la population.
     
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