Cause: "Black's cause is completely hopeless"

< Previous | Next >

trainer3000

Banned
FARSI
hi,
What does it mean that:
"Black's cause is completely hopeless"?

please offer some dictionary-based meaning.

Thanks in qadvance!
 
  • Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    Black is an in an inescapably losing position. White's triumph is inevitable.

    cause: "4. the welfare or interests of a person or group in a dispute: they fought for the miners' cause"
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    Effectively, yes.

    Given that the context, it's a less boring way of saying that black will lose because white's advantage is unassailable.

    If black's cause is completely hopeless, he should resign now (unless there's a residual chance of playing for a draw).
     

    trainer3000

    Banned
    FARSI
    well, always play on.Maybe the opponent is affected by a stroke:)

    But is it that Black has no hope or is it that Black does have hope but the author suggests that there is non worthy of consideration?
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    > Maybe the opponent is affected by a stroke :D

    Yes, there's that. But I think that we have to assume that the author means that with best play, and no heart attacks, the game is over for black.

    > But is it that Black has no hope or is it that Black does have hope but the author suggests that there is none worthy of consideration?

    If black has no plan (hope) worthy if consideration, then black has no hope.
     

    trainer3000

    Banned
    FARSI
    philosophically speaking, having hope is a rather subjunctive matter, isn't it?

    I seek to ask if it is the case that Black is hopeful, but the author thinks that he should not be and that it is a futile hope.
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    > philosophically speaking, having hope is a rather subjunctive matter, isn't it?

    Yes, you could say that (and you did). You need forget about philosophy, and psychology. You're quoting from a chess primer.

    The author, note carefully, is talking about black, ie. the pieces, not the human opponent.
    More specifically, he is talking about a configuration on the board.
    By saying 'black's cause is completely hopeless' he is merely injecting a little colour into his writing with a hint of metaphor and a dash of anthropomorphism.

    The chessmen, and ultimately the configuration of those chessmen, are sublimely indifferent to any abstract value we may happen to assign to them.

    'black's cause is completely hopeless' = with best play, the game will conclude in one of several configurations known as checkmate for white (it could get a little wearing, don't you think?).
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top