cause irritation on/in the wound

Roymalika

Senior Member
Punjabi
If we have a wound on our skin, we should not used soap, because the soap can cause irritation on/in the wound.

Source: self-made

Which preposition is correct, please?
 
  • Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    Yes.

    "Cause irritation in" is possibly grammatical but it's unnatural.

    With "on", it sounds even more wrong.
     

    Roymalika

    Senior Member
    Punjabi
    Either ' . . . irritate' or ' . . . cause irritation'.

    There's no need for 'on', 'in' or 'the wound.'
    If this was a standalone sentence, ie, no mention of 'wound' before as is in my OP, would it be all right to say "Soap can cause irritation on/in wounds"?
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    As I said above, they aren't natural phrases here. Making it a stand-alone sentence doesn't change that. Soap can irritate wounds.

     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    "Soap can cause irritation OF wounds" is a perfectly reasonable sentence and is in no way "unnatural".
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    No, but that's because he doesn't know which preposition to use, and it's normal practice in this forum to try to help learners who, as is usual, struggle with prepositions.
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    Yes, of course. Your comment sounded to me as if you thought someone had said "irritation of wounds' was unnatural, and were disagreeing with them. I thought it might be me because I'd used that word, and you put it in quotes. :)

    (And I don't particularly like "Soap can cause irritation of wounds" either but maybe that's just me.)
     
    Last edited:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top