'Cause she won't be taking anything good. Because they'll be doing rough and tumble stuff

paolo88

New Member
Italiano - Italia
Hi everyone!! :)

I was reading an essay which is about the use of the progressive form. I found this sentence, but I can't understand it.. My essay is about linguistics, so the sentence is an example taken from a corpus and reported in inverted commas. This is the sentence:

" 'Cause she won't be taking anything good. Because the'll be doing rough and tumble stuff". What does it mean (I do not ask for a translation..just the meaning, especially of the second part)?? By the way, is the use of progressive form right here??

Thank you!!!!
 
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  • dreamlike

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Are you sure that the second sentence reads "the'll be doing" rather than "they'll be doing..."? If so, it doesn't make any sense to me.

    She won't be taking anything good means to me, outside any context - she will not experience anything good, something she would benefit from.
     

    Nettle*

    Member
    Russian
    She won't be taking anything good...
    If you take something in a particular way, it means you react in this way. So it must mean she doesn't like the way they act.
    They'll be doing rough and tumble stuff.
    They are going to do something offensive, abusive, illegal... whatever. Something bad. They are going to be rough, rude, wild...
    Anyway this is how I take it.:)
     

    JustKate

    Moderate Mod
    I don't think I can interpret any of this without more context. Taking has a lot of potential meanings, and none of them seems obvious from what little context you've provided, at least not to me.

    And Dreamlike's right about the'll, of course.
     

    dreamlike

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Would you care to provide more context (I think a sentence or two before "she won't be taking" would be sufficient) so that we can comment on the actual meaning?
     

    paolo88

    New Member
    Italiano - Italia
    Unfortunately, I can't! I know there is not enough material, but the sentence I gave you was the only one provided in my essay.
     

    JustKate

    Moderate Mod
    Then that wasn't very smart of the essay writer, I must say. Even as a native speaker, I can't tell what this means out of context. For example, the very first meanings I thought of for taking when I read this were "stealing" and "using" (as in "taking drugs"). Those are very different meanings, but either one might be possible depending on the context. And what either of these, or any other meaning I can think of, have to do with "rough and tumble" (which is an established idiom that means violent or disorderly) is more than I can say.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    For example, the very first meanings I thought of for taking when I read this were "stealing" and "using" (as in "taking drugs").
    The first meaning I thought of was that she didn't enroll in any good classes at school. Evidently, she's just taking some physical contact sports.

    Without any other context, it's just pure guesswork.
     

    EStjarn

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    In case it may be of help, it's apparently Australian English.

    Here's a Google Books preview of a linguistics book (Comparative Studies in Australian and New Zealand English) containing the sentence in question, which in turn is referenced as "ICE-AUS S1A-005: 167, 169," where ICE-AUS is an abbreviation for the Australian component of International Corpus of English.
     
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