'cause

taraa

Senior Member
Persian
Is "'cause" here the reduced of "because"? Or is it "just cause" with this meaning in here?
Just cause means a legally sufficient reason. Just cause is sometimes referred to as good cause, lawful cause or sufficient cause.



Monica: There's nothing to tell! He's just some guy I work with!
Joey: C'mon, you're going out with the guy! There's gotta be something wrong with him!
Chandler: So does he have a hump? A hump and a hairpiece?
Phoebe: Wait, does he eat chalk?
Phoebe: Just, 'cause, I don't want her to go through what I went through with Carl- oh!

Friends, season 1, episode 1
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    No, the comma and apostrophe show that it's the short form of because. It is very commonly shortened in speech; in writing this is shown in various ways: cos or cuz are used, and if the spelling cause is used, an apostrophe helps to make it clear that it's the short form.
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    You did notice the comma after "just" and the apostrophe before "cause", didn't you? "Just, 'cause "
    Thank you very much!
    I didn't notoce the comma. I just noticed the apostrophe but I didn't know what apostrophe means.
    No, the comma and apostrophe show that it's the short form of because. It is very commonly shortened in speech; in writing this is shown in various ways: cos or cuz are used, and if the spelling cause is used, an apostrophe helps to make it clear that it's the short form.
    Thank you very much!
     
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