causes ... which, expected or foreseeable, are unavoidable.

Michelle Green

Senior Member
Chinese
Hi all,
Could you help me with a question? Below is taken from the Terms of Use of a website.

1. Power or telephone failure;
2. Fires, floods, earthquakes or other natural events;
3. ...
4. ...
These causes, amongst others, are of an unforeseeable nature or which, expected or foreseeable, are unavoidable.
I don't really understand this sentence, especially the structure of the red part. And what does "which" refer to?
Thank you in advance.
 
  • rhitagawr

    Senior Member
    British English
    It means that fires etc. are unforeseeable or, if they're not, you can't do anything about them anyway. The which refers to these causes. It's a clumsy reference, like saying The flowers or which are on the table are red. The last part should be rewritten as something like ...nature or are unavoidable even when they are expected or foreseeable.
    Of an unforeseeable nature is a long-winded way of saying unforeseeable.
     

    Michelle Green

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    It means that fires etc. are unforeseeable or, if they're not, you can't do anything about them anyway. The which refers to these causes. It's a clumsy reference, like saying The flowers or which are on the table are red. The last part should be rewritten as something like ...nature or are unavoidable even when they are expected or foreseeable.
    Of an unforeseeable nature is a long-winded way of saying unforeseeable.
    Got it, thanks a lot. :)
     
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