cease to worry / cease worrying (gerund/infinitive)

cisco795

Senior Member
Mexican Spanish
what is/are the difference(s) between these two words?

I know cease can take INFINITIVE/GERUND after it without changing the meaning unlike to stop that changes its meaning when used with either Infinitive or gerund after it, most of the time I have trouble knowing which of the two to use, I appologize for not being able to give any examples right at this moment.

"The government cease to worry about a financial crashing in the automotive industry".
"The government cease worrying about a financial crashing in the automotive industry".

Thanks in advance.
 
  • benjo788

    Senior Member
    English - London
    Stop is more common than cease. I practiced using them in sentences and cease just sounds funny, though I can't tell you why exactly.
    'He ceased to see her' and 'He ceased seeing her' both are grammatically correct (I believe) but sound funny. 'He stopped seeing her' sounds far more natural, but 'He stopped to see her' does not mean 'Dejó de verla' as the others do, but instead means 'Paró para verla'.
    So, for now, I'd say use stop + gerund - it's the safest option.
    Other people might be able to shed a little more light on this though :)
     

    workingonit

    Senior Member
    English - American
    "The government cease to worry about a financial crashing in the automotive industry". :cross:
    "The government cease worrying about a financial crashing in the automotive industry". :cross:
    Each of your examples should be in the past tense: ceased.

    "Cease" is used in legal documents, most particularly in a "cease and desist order." In most ordinary speech or writing, I agree that it would seem strange.
     

    cisco795

    Senior Member
    Mexican Spanish
    Each of your examples should be in the past tense: ceased.

    "Cease" is used in legal documents, most particularly in a "cease and desist order." In most ordinary speech or writing, I agree that it would seem strange.
    Simple and yet remarkable, thanks a lot for both, correcting my mistakes and explaining the usage of these words.
     

    neal41

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Each of your examples should be in the past tense: ceased.

    "Cease" is used in legal documents, most particularly in a "cease and desist order." In most ordinary speech or writing, I agree that it would seem strange.
    'Stop' is certainly more common than 'cease', but I do not regard the use of 'cease' as strange. Your sentence would sound perfectly normal in the form

    The government ceased to worry/worrying about a financial crash in the automotive industry.

    I found numerous examples of 'ceased coughing' on the internet.

    Note 'crash' instead of 'crashing'.
     

    Sköll

    Senior Member
    English, US
    It does not cease to amaze me how easily something is declared as "regional". It could simply be difference in register. ;)
     

    cisco795

    Senior Member
    Mexican Spanish
    Thank you all for taking the time to help others. All of your inputs have helped me. I also want to express my gratitude for the corrections made to my mistakes, it helps a lot, that way I will not be "crashing" the beautiful English language as much. :)
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top