celebrate or celebrating/ present simple or continous thing

antisaint

Member
polish, Malbork
Hi! I have a small problem with the following sentences:
#1: Which anniversary of the discovery of insulin do we celebrate today?
#2: Which anniversary of the discovery of insulin are we celebrating today?
I wonder which form is written in the proper way? The main thing of the sentence is of course if it's f.ex. 89th or 90th anniversary. To me the second sentence looks more convincing. Thanks in advance for every reply.
 
  • Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    A. I am assuming you wrote these sentences yourself - Is that correct or is it part of a test?
    B. I don't recognise "f.ex.". I presume it means "e.g."


    1. means
    Which anniversary of the discovery of insulin do we customarily celebrate today?

    2. means
    Which anniversary of the discovery of insulin are we actually celebrating today?
     

    Franco-filly

    Senior Member
    English - Southern England
    I agree that the second sounds better - although the first is probably not incorrect.
    I would say "...do we celebrate" when followed by a date: Which anniversary of the discovery of insulin do we celebrate on the 14th of November?
     

    antisaint

    Member
    polish, Malbork
    A. True. Do they look sloppy?
    B. You're right. Sorry but I meant exactly what you wrote(e.g.)
    But I have a question: If the answer is: 90th anniversary; that should imply that the sentence with -ing form is more correct?
     
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