Certificated vs Certified

BoaSorte

Member
Italiano
Hi there, this is my first post/question!

I don't understand the difference between these two words and when it's correct to use one or the other.
I'm talking about a work experience I did and I want to say that I have a certification for that.
Both the two forms exist, even if CERTIFICATE it's not a verb.

Can you help me?

Thanks a lot!
 
  • Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Hello BoaSorte.

    Welcome to the forum. :)

    I agree with you that 'certificate' is not a verb, so certificated (which is a verb form) is not standard English.

    You can say that you have certification for that kind of work, as you do in your post.
    Of you can say that you have been certified for that kind of work.

    Does this answer your question?
     

    roxcyn

    Senior Member
    USA
    American English [AmE]
    Certificate is the paper they give you upon completing training class(es) such as CPR. You can say "Certified in CPR" or "Received CPR certification"
     

    BoaSorte

    Member
    Italiano
    Thank you for the immediate answer! :)
    You must excuse me, I wrote wrong, what I really wanted to say is that I have a certification OF the job I did.

    So I'm not saying I'm qualified for the position I'm applying, but that I can prove I did the previous job.
     

    loghrat

    Senior Member
    British English / Danish
    Hi there, this is my first post/question!

    I don't understand the difference between these two words and when it's correct to use one or the other.
    I'm talking about a work experience I did and I want to say that I have a certification for that.
    Both the two forms exist, even if CERTIFICATE it's not a verb.

    Can you help me?

    Thanks a lot!
    None of the words certificated/certified/certificate sounds right to me in the context of work experience, unless you - as part of it - obtained some sort of Certificate to prove your competence in the work you performed.
     
    Last edited:

    loghrat

    Senior Member
    British English / Danish
    Thank you for the immediate answer! :)
    You must excuse me, I wrote wrong, what I really wanted to say is that I have a certification OF the job I did.

    So I'm not saying I'm qualified for the position I'm applying, but that I can prove I did the previous job.
    I wonder what you mean by 'certification' ? Is it a standard, maybe nationally recognised, Certificate ? Or a letter or statement from the employer saying that you are competent to perform the work? If it is the latter, I don't think we would call it 'certification' in English.
     

    BoaSorte

    Member
    Italiano
    None of the words certificated/certified/certificate sounds right to me in the context of work experience, unless you - as part of it - obtained some sort of Certificate to prove your competence in the work you performed.
    It's exactly like that, I received a certification at the end.
     

    BoaSorte

    Member
    Italiano
    I wonder what you mean by 'certification' ? Is it a standard, maybe nationally recognised, Certificate ? Or a letter or statement from the employer saying that you are competent to perform the work? If it is the latter, I don't think we would call it 'certification' in English.
    Yes a certification, similar to the one you can receive at the end of a course of language.
    Can I use the word certified?
     

    roxcyn

    Senior Member
    USA
    American English [AmE]
    Employers don't want you to say "I'm not qualified." That is a big no-no. You may want to list it as I did in post number three.
     

    J. Easter

    New Member
    English
    In education, it's definitely correct to say "certificated." Products are certified; people are certificated.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    I know it was a long time ago, but
    I agree with you that 'certificate' is not a verb
    I have to disagree. Certificate as a verb has been around for many years meaning "To furnish (a person) with a certificate", as the OED puts it.

     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    My new word for the day from the forum :thumbsup: - it sounded weird but I see it's been out there for a while. It's the same feeling I had as when I learnt that "obligated" was real and in some cases means something different from "obliged".
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top