certified/qualified

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quietdandelion

Banned
Formosa/Chinese
There is a popular notion that a college education is something to be endured in order to become certified/qualified to obtain certain kinds of jobs or go to graduate school.



For a start, I'd like to know if certified and qualified are indentical in meaning and interchangeable here?
Second, is become optional here? Thanks.
 
  • Tresley

    Senior Member
    British English
    Hello QuietDandelion,

    I have never though about this before seeing your question, however, my understanding is as follows:

    Certified = someone has a certificate to say that they are qualified to do something.

    Qualified = someone who has qualified to do something, and may have a certificate to prove this.

    What do others think?
     

    quietdandelion

    Banned
    Formosa/Chinese
    Hello QuietDandelion,

    I have never though about this before seeing your question, however, my understanding is as follows:

    Certified = someone has a certificate to say that they are qualified to do something.

    Qualified = someone who has qualified to do something, and may have a certificate to prove this.

    What do others think?
    Thanks, Tresley.
    Just to make sure, is it also right to say "someone who is qualied to do something and may have a certificate to prove this?"
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Anyone with the required skills could be qualified.

    Someone with the required skills who has been tested and has passed the test would be certified.

    In New York State you need to be qualified and certified to be a lifeguard.
     

    quietdandelion

    Banned
    Formosa/Chinese
    Anyone with the required skills could be qualified.

    Someone with the required skills who has been tested and has passed the test would be certified.

    In New York State you need to be qualified and certified to be a lifeguard.
    Thanks, Packard, for the clearcut comments.
    Yet, I still like to know if I could use the active voice:
    Anyone with the required skills could qualify.
    Someone with the required skills who has been tested and has passed the test would certify.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I would write:

    Someone with the required skills who has been tested and has passed the test would be certified.

    As the administrator of the tests, having seen how well he performed, I decided that I would certify him as a lifeguard.

    The person administering the tests would certify; the person passing the tests would be certified.
     

    cycloneviv

    Senior Member
    English - Australia
    I'd add that certified has a connotation of having gone through some sort of legal process. You can train as and accountant and, as soon as you finish your degree you could be said to be qualified but you are not certified until you go through further processes with a regulatory body which certifies your suitability to be a practitioner.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    "The vendor was ISO certified so we did not have to send our personnel to their facility to do our own certification. An ISO certification was sufficient to convince us that they were qualified."
     
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