c'est la fête aujourd'hui

cestpasgagne

New Member
France, French
Bonjour,

Je me demandais comment on pourrait traduire l'expression "c'est la fête aujourdhui" en anglais. C'est une expression (tres) familliere dont le sens est celui qu'aujourd'hui tout le monde agit bizarrement, anormalement, comme des fous, "comme si c'etait la fete"(et sous entendu ca vous enerve un peu et vous n'apprecier pas ce comportement).

Merci des propositions,

D x
 
  • born in newyork

    Senior Member
    U.S.A./English
    Dans cette situation, on dit souvent en Anglais: "There must be a full moon out tonight."

    Durant la pleine lune, les loups-garous sortent et hurlent!
     

    cestpasgagne

    New Member
    France, French
    Thanks, there is indeed a similar idea. But I am not quite sure this means exactly the same, in french there is less the idea of acting weird than cheeky.
    Any other suggestions?
     

    born in newyork

    Senior Member
    U.S.A./English
    Hmm. I based my answer on your description of people acting "bizarrement, anormalement, comme des fous" !! That fits the "full moon" expression perfectly.

    If it's just "cheeky," nothing comes to mind immediately. Perhaps some more explanation of the expression would help: for example, why people act "cheeky" during a holiday/festival? Can you describe give a situation where the expression is used?
     

    Wunibald

    Senior Member
    English
    I don't know that there's a direct equivalent. You could say something like:
    Everyone seems to have gone bonkers... that would convey the notion.
     

    pyan

    Senior Member
    English, UK, London
    Would either of these come close?
    "There's a hint of excitement in the air". This is quite restrained, weak.

    "Everyone is (or seems to be) in a party mood" This is a literal translation, and means that people are ready to laugh, are friendly and lighthearted. There is a lot of joking. It still sounds weaker than the French expression.
     

    cestpasgagne

    New Member
    France, French
    Sorry, my mistake.
    I would say that for instance if someone act "illegally" , do not respect the procedure, rules, etc (very very small things like overtaking in a queue, stealing your seat, etc). This a way to say that they are rude and you so not appreciate their behaviour.
    In French I would say "être sans gêne" is the idea.
    This has nothing to do with any festival or anything.

    Hope this helps and is not too confused. It is hard to discribe an expression so familiar.
     
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