c'est le métier qui rentre

Discussion in 'French-English Vocabulary / Vocabulaire Français-Anglais' started by GreatView, Oct 15, 2007.

  1. GreatView Member

    USA, English/Russian
    Bonjour à tous,

    Est-ce que vous pouvez proposer des équivalents anglais de l'expression "c'est le métier qui rentre"?

    Merci d'avance
     
  2. Floor Senior Member

    North of France
    French France
    You learn by your mistakes!
     
  3. On Retrouve a Paris Senior Member

    Mandarin plus MinNan Hua(my dialect)
    Il me semble que le sens est loin entre ce deux expressions (c'est le métier qui rentre et you learn by your mistakes)...
    Pardon, vous être sûre Floor?:idea: Vous pouvez citer un exemple pour 'c'est le métier qui rentre'?
    Merci d'avance.
     
  4. victoria1 Senior Member

    Mauritius - English & French
    it's just learning the hard way. Je suis d'accord avec la proposition de Floor.
     
  5. Floor Senior Member

    North of France
    French France
    Cette phrase française est dite à quelqu'un qui a fait une erreur, pour le réconforter en quelque sorte et l'inciter à persévérer.
    Regarde ce post, c'est dans la section français-espagnol mais c'est écrit en français:
    http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=164435
     
  6. On Retrouve a Paris Senior Member

    Mandarin plus MinNan Hua(my dialect)
    Merci beaucoup Floor:)
    Je me demandes si il y a autres expressions qui sou entendent le même sens? Vous savez?
     
  7. fabfab Senior Member

    France - Grenoble
    French - France
    What do you think of
    put it down to experience
     
  8. On Retrouve a Paris Senior Member

    Mandarin plus MinNan Hua(my dialect)
    i never heard of put it down to experience. So that is an expression having the same meaning as c'est le metier qui rentre? (we learn from our mistake)?
    thanks for your reply.
     
  9. GreatView Member

    USA, English/Russian
    "put it down to experience" does not quite work. I've come to think about this phrase ("c'est le métier qui rentre") as "knowledge comes from experience".
     
  10. Shang Qin Li

    Shang Qin Li Senior Member

    French Alps
    UK born Live in France English
    I can't think of a direct equivalent in English. I am not even sure there is one.
    "you learn by your mistakes", "practice makes perfect", "knowledge comes from experience" are all fine, yet a bit far away from the french expression
    I can only imagine a conversation such as
    - Gee, I've made a mistake again !
    - Don't worry, you're starting to get the hang of it.
    Still, it is not entirely satisfying
     
  11. fabfab Senior Member

    France - Grenoble
    French - France
    Well the Longman Dictionary says:
    put it down to experience = to try not to feel too upset about failure, especially when you learn something useful from it

    And Floor said about c'est le métier qui rentre:
    So why does not it work? :confused:
     
  12. Angle O'Phial

    Angle O'Phial Senior Member

    USA English
    Sounds good to me. You can also say chalk it up to experience which is perhaps more common in AmE than put it down.
     
  13. Shang Qin Li

    Shang Qin Li Senior Member

    French Alps
    UK born Live in France English
    Sounds nice, too. Perhaps a bit more precise than "get the hang of it" (although you'll hear that often in the UK)
     
  14. Staarkali

    Staarkali Senior Member

    I believe we would rather use this expression when a rookie in some field hurts himself, leaving minor physical injuries (as cutting oneself when cooking, or a small shock when repairing some electrical device).

    I wouldn't use the French expression if the mistake only affect the result of the job or other people.

    Hope it helps!
     
  15. GreatView Member

    USA, English/Russian
    Dear fabfab,

    My saying "put it down to experience" does not quite" work is only a personal statement - I have not once come across this expression. And Angle O'Phial made it clear to me why I haven't heard it - because it's british, rather than american. "Chalk it up to experience" sounds much more natural to me right away. So I thank you both.
    I also think that the further note of Staarkali (about there been some minor injuries) is essential, because every time I hear "c'est le métier qui rentre" it is applied to somebody who had just hurt him/herself doing something new to them!
     
  16. Shang Qin Li

    Shang Qin Li Senior Member

    French Alps
    UK born Live in France English
    Dear GreatView and Staarkali,
    That expression will be used if, as Staarkali puts it, a rookies hurts himself while doing whatever he is doing, but not solely in that case. There can be no injury or wound; it is then a way of encouraging someone who has managed to make a step forward by overcoming a difficulty after a lot of efforts. The advantage of "Chalk it up to experience" is that it encompasses both possibilities.
     
  17. On Retrouve a Paris Senior Member

    Mandarin plus MinNan Hua(my dialect)
    chalk it up to experience, good expression - now i have one more way to say when I am discouraged by my work:)
    thanks!
     
  18. thewritersroom New Member

    English - British
    I know it's an old thread, but how about 'it's all a learning curve'? That would work in most situations.
     

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