c'est mon dada

MalinK

Senior Member
england english
j'ai souvent lu ce mot "dada" dans les textes, les journals etc mais je n'arrive jamais a le comprendre completement...
Est-ce que quelqu'un pourrait me l'expliquer?
Merci
 
  • Blancheneige

    Senior Member
    Switzerland - French
    "La peinture, c'est son dada" signifie que peindre est l'occupation favorite de la personne dont on parle.
    On utilise ce mot pour parler d'une occupation à laquelle la personne concernée tient vraiment beaucoup.
     

    logique

    Senior Member
    France
    Un synonyme moins familier : "son violon d'Ingres" (Ingres was a painter but he really played well violin (If I well remembered he had long hesitated between painting and music and his detractors said he should have chosen violin).
    On dit aussi beaucoup "hobby" même en français !
     

    Hese

    Senior Member
    German
    Hello there!

    Could anybody help me with the translation of "c'est mon dada"?

    I found "hobby horse" in the dictionary and wonder whether this is usually used.

    For example:

    My English teacher is very strict and grammar is her hobbyhorse.

    Please don't broach "chess", otherwise he might be talking for hours, it's his hobbyhorse.

    I also found another equivalent: pet subject.

    Please give me your point of view! Thank you in advance!
     

    hugo1972

    Senior Member
    Creole English French
    Hmmm.. Sorry, I just did a quick check on 'hobbyhorse'. Looks like you can use 'hobbyhorse' as well as 'pet subject'... but in my opinion both are old fashioned... I can't remember the last time I read or heard these expressions being used.
     

    st0ryins0il

    New Member
    english
    also a hobbyhorse is a horses head on a stick children use as a pretend game.


    my example would be...

    i love to ride my hobbyhorse, c'est mon dada!
     

    eg213

    Member
    english
    Hmm difficult. Definitely not 'hobbyhorse' though, you'll never hear that nowadays.
    I think I'd just go for 'he's really interested in it', or 'he's really in to it'.
     

    wildan1

    Moderando ma non troppo (French-English, CC Mod)
    English - USA
    Hmm difficult. Definitely not 'hobbyhorse' though, you'll never hear that nowadays.
    I think I'd just go for 'he's really interested in it', or 'he's really in to it'.

    The first one doesn't reflect the "flavor" of the French term dada

    The second is OK, but spelled He's really into it (one word)
     
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