C'est une maladie dont nous avons beaucoup peur

sarrah

Senior Member
Arabic
C,est une maladie dont nous avons beaucoup peur

In the above sentence the word "dont " is best translated :

as :

whose
or
Of which

Thanks a billion...
 
  • timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    sarrah said:
    C,est une maladie dont nous avons beaucoup peur

    In the above sentence the word "dont " is best translated :

    as :

    whose
    or
    Of which

    Thanks a billion...
    Sarrah - try suggesting translations, one using "whose" and one using "of which" - that will probably give you the answer.
     

    vince

    Senior Member
    English
    "It's an illness that we're all afraid of" is the best translation

    The way I learned "dont" was to think of the rule in French instead of trying to find every possible english translation.

    It just basically replaces que + de.

    So a sentence like *le livre que je parle de, turns into le livre dont je parle

    *le magasin que le propriétaire de ne parle pas anglais , becomes le magasin dont le propriétaire ne parle pas anglais.

    or in the original sentence:

    *"la maladie que nous avons beaucoup peur de"

    (* is used to denote a grammatically incorrect statement used to illustrate a concept)

    This is better than trying to figure out when dont means "of which", "from which", "whose", etc...
     

    sarrah

    Senior Member
    Arabic
    Hi: The "dont " in the above sentence is Translated

    as : Whose / of which
    But how we suppose to know which Word are the Best here ...
    TIA...
     

    vince

    Senior Member
    English
    Oh, are you learning English from French?

    Then it's a different story.

    "whose" indicates possession.

    The man whose name is John is wearing a T-shirt (that man's name is John)

    The car whose owner is a New Yorker has nice rims (that car's owner is a New Yorker

    The computer whose screen needs repairs is the red one (that computer's screen needs repairs)
     

    CARNESECCHI

    Senior Member
    French / France
    Hello,
    "whose" was for people and "of which" was for things/concepts but It seems that, for many years (if not century) the common use replaced "of which" by "whose".
    You can still find "of which" with this meaning in formal/technical documents :
    "Our Conditions of Sales, copies of which will be supplied on request"
    Or where it does not indicate possession
    "The text contains encrypted messages, of which three have been solved so far."
    Hope it helps
     
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