Chalk pusher

MAle121

New Member
Italian
EDIT: I'm really sorry for the bad start, I know being in a hurry is not an excuse.

Hi, I'm new here. Sorry again!
I' currently working on anime subtitles, and I found this "chalk pusher" thing. The context is almost inexistent: a boy finds out that someone he thought was a student is actually a teacher.

"Hold it right there! The hell? A teacher? You're a goddamn chalk pusher?"

I've never heard of this before, but I think it's slang for "teacher". Am I right? Can anyone suggest a good translation to Italian? Please?
 
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  • Teerex51

    Senior Member
    Italian, standard
    MAle, starting off with the usual salutations would have earned you some Brownie points. But that's an option...:rolleyes:

    The house rules for posting are not an option, though, and I suggest you read them. Paul just saw to that.

    But my first comment stays the same.
     

    WordsWordWords

    Senior Member
    Am English
    Hi MAle and welcome!

    Before we can help you, forum rules state you need to offer your own attempt at the translation. That way you are learning too, from your own efforts!

    Also, for those of us who know a bit less about your context, what is meant by "anime subtitles"? <<< The more context we have the easier it is to help you.
    :)
     

    Teerex51

    Senior Member
    Italian, standard
    Chalk pusher is indeed a derogatory term for a teacher.

    While the similar terms pencil pusher/paper pusher have consolidated Italian equivalents (scribacchino/passacarte), I'm not sure a set translation for chalk pusher actually exists. :confused:
     

    MAle121

    New Member
    Italian
    Hi MAle and welcome!

    Before we can help you, forum rules state you need to offer your own attempt at the translation. That way you are learning too, from your own efforts!

    Also, for those of us who know a bit less about your context, what is meant by "anime subtitles"? <<< The more context we have the easier it is to help you.
    :)
    Hi! First of all, "subtitles" means... well, subtitles. Anime stands for Japanese animation. I'm translating English subtitles to Italian (or, well, at least trying).

    Second of all, I know rules state I should try and translate, but I really have no idea what "chalk pusher" means and searching the internet isn't helping. Also, if I really am right about the meaning, I have no idea if there's a "slang" word for teacher in Italian.
     

    WordsWordWords

    Senior Member
    Am English
    Hi again MAle,

    Thank you for the help with "anime". (And yes, subtitles was not the problem :D)

    Can you show us what you have written so far for the phrase your OP?


    (Hint: sometimes by jotting down something, anything, it unblocks the mind and you may surprise yourself with finding a solution or at least providing a start...)

    ;)


     

    MAle121

    New Member
    Italian
    Chalk pusher is indeed a derogatory term for a teacher.

    While the similar terms pencil pusher/paper pusher have consolidated Italian equivalents (scribacchino/passacarte), I'm not sure a set translation for chalk pusher actually exists. :confused:
    Thanks, Teerex. Do you think I could translate "You're a goddamn chalk pusher?" into "Sei una maledetta prof?" or something similar? I'm really out of ideas. "Prof" isn't really derogatory, though.
     

    MAle121

    New Member
    Italian
    Hi again MAle,

    Thank you for the help with "anime". (And yes, subtitles was not the problem :D)

    Can you show us what you have written so far for the phrase your OP?


    (Hint: sometimes by jotting down something, anything, it unblocks the mind and you may surprise yourself with finding a solution or at least providing a start...)

    ;)


    Since not much is said, it's a bit hard to explain what happens before. I'll try.
    The boy doesn't want a form to be given to a teacher. He gives it to a girl and plans to take it from her while she goes to the teachers' room (?). The girl, though, gives the form to (someone who looks just like) another girl.
    The boy shouts: "Aspettate un attimo! Che significa? Un'insegnante? You're a goddamn chalk pusher?".
    She introduces herself as a teacher. He steals the form and runs away.

    That's pretty much it. I don't know if it's helping. I don't even know if anything can be understood from what I wrote. I'm really sorry. :/
     

    WordsWordWords

    Senior Member
    Am English
    Since not much is said, it's a bit hard to explain what happens before. I'll try.
    The boy doesn't want a form to be given to a teacher. He gives it to a girl and plans to take it from her while she goes to the teachers' room (?). The girl, though, gives the form to (someone who looks just like) another girl.
    The boy shouts: "Aspettate un attimo! Che significa? Un'insegnante? You're a goddamn chalk pusher?".
    She introduces herself as a teacher. He steals the form and runs away.

    That's pretty much it. I don't know if it's helping. I don't even know if anything can be understood from what I wrote. I'm really sorry. :/
    Hey MAle, now that's the spirit! That DOES help (me at least!) to get a better picture of your situation :)

    OK, so no swearing. (A pity, Teerex had a nice idea!) -- what about:

    (Your original):

    "Hold it right there! The hell? A teacher? You're a goddamn chalk pusher?"

    My attempt:

    "Aspetta un attimo! Ma che roba è? Un insegnante? Sei una maledetta insegnante?"

    Could that work?

    PS I hate to say it, but it's strange that you cannot use swearing in your translation because in English, :warn:goddamn is considered as such and hell is pretty borderline...

    Good one L'Enrico! >>> Sei un maledetto imbratta lavagne?
    (We crossed!)
     
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    MAle121

    New Member
    Italian
    Thanks everybody! I think I'll go with "imbratta lavagne", since it's quite similar to the original meaning. (Thank you Enrico!)
    Also, the boy repeats "chalk pusher" afterwards, but without "goddamn" or similar words, so if I just use "insegnante" or "prof" it may not communicate the right idea (this boy really thinks he's a delinquent).

    PS I hate to say it, but it's strange that you cannot use swearing in your translation because in English, :warn:goddamn is considered as such and hell is pretty borderline...
    I know, but
    1. My sub group has really strict rules about swear words. The rules are: "NO."
    2. In Japanese they have no actual swear words, so any English translation with swearing is quite inaccurate.
     
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