chambered

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Diddy

Senior Member
Spanish
Hi forum!!!

What is a richly chambered landscape, into the following context:

"In richly chambered landscapes (e.g. mountain regions and islands) that have a tradition of extensive management, adapted use is essential for conservation".

I am carrying this from the Spanish-English forum, but I really got lost with so many different points of views, and if I understand what really the term is, maybe I will be able to translate it accurately.

Thanks again,
 
  • panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    That is a very odd use of chambered, which probably explains the many different points of view you have been offered. It is not a normal collocation, it does not have a clear and unambiguous meaning.
     

    Diddy

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    That is a very odd use of chambered, which probably explains the many different points of view you have been offered. It is not a normal collocation, it does not have a clear and unambiguous meaning.
    Thanks a lot panjandrum... it is a relief to know that this is odd!!! Then, I was not that lost as I thought...
    Have a nice weekend!!!
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    May we ask, gently, where this came from?
    It's possible that wider context, or some information about the source, might help explain this peculiar expression.
     

    Diddy

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    May we ask, gently, where this came from?
    It's possible that wider context, or some information about the source, might help explain this peculiar expression.
    Well, as I explained earlier I carried this from the Spanish-English forum. I already asked to whom made the original posting to bring more context here in order for you to help us. Then, the only thing to wait is for his posting in this forum in order to continue with this theme.
    Thanks a lot again for your interest...
     
    Hi! I'm brand new at the Wordforum -beginning in the English-Spanish forum where I posted a thread for the term Diddy has brought to this English forum.

    More context for this awkward term --It's about diverse cultural landscapes and traditional agroecosystems: "In richly chambered landscapes (e.g. mountain regions and islands) that have a tradition of extensive management, adapted use is essential for conservation. Over centuries, production systems were developed and optimised according to a specific environment and culture. These systems are characterised by a regionally adapted mixture of wild flora and fauna and domesticated diversity. Without appropriate management, the natural biodiversity becomes impoverished."

    I hope it brings more light. Thanks in advance
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Another small question - "..., adapted use is essential ..."
    Can you explain what "adapted use" means?
    Perhaps you could give us an example of a location that shows "richly chambered landscapes" and "adapted use"?

    (Hello rapunzel13, and welcome :))
     
    Thanks Panjandrum!
    With reference to your question I must say that I'm not the author of the article, I'm translating it, and I have almost the same doubts as you...
    I figure out that "adapted use" refers to forms of use of natural resources that are "adapted to the place" -like terrace landscapes.

    The general idea that I've got of this "chambered landscapes" is the example given --mountains, islands-- and the reference to places "under difficult environmental conditions"

    More context: "The natural environment provides resources such as adaptation of cultivated plants through cross-pollination by wild plants, use of wild plants, wood , shade, phytomedicine, etc. These factors are integrated into a system and subject to the interactions that take place between nature and culture. Practices and techniques were traditionally developed for a sustainable production under difficult environmental conditions."
     

    Catheina

    New Member
    English - United States (southern)
    I found a document with that phrase. It is the only document Google found with the phrase "richly chambered landscapes", so I assume it is the one from which the sentence came. This thing won't let me post URLs, so y'all can look it up for yourselves if you want to see it.

    It's a weird document to me. I think chambered could refer to being cavernous (having lots of caves), but even with the context of the whole document, it's not clear.

    I suspect the person who wrote it was not a native-English speaker, because they used "und" where it should have been "and". I think "und" is "and" in some European languages. I know it is in German. The website with the document has English, German and French... so I think whoever wrote it is probably a native-German speaker. You could see if "chamber" in German could be translated any other way into English, and that could give you a clue. I don't know enough about German to do that. It could just be an idiom that doesn't translate well. Or, it could refer to some aspect of geography that is unique to Europe that I wouldn't know. Or, it could just be some European way of saying something that doesn't make a bit of sense to me. :)

    Sorry for the post with Spanish earlier. I didn't realize I was in an English-only one. I'm new at this, too. I hope I didn't put anything this time that I shouldn't have.

    I hope this helps more than it confuses!
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Based on the comments so far and the background provided this chambered landscape might perhaps be meant to suggest an environment that has a number of relatively isolated eco-systems that may be very individual.

    This could well apply in mountain regions, especially those in the midst of extreme climatic conditions, and in islands, encouraged by their geographic isolation.

    Catheina's link :)
     

    Full Tilt Boogie

    Senior Member
    British English
    Hang on...just had a thought.

    Remember the Soviet collective farming/planned-economy systems?

    If you take a mile-high view, you can see that there is vista-upon-vista of 'box'/chamber-shaped fields with different, 'highly managed' and 'adapted for use' land which has been put over to planned use and landscaped (in an agricultural way) , i.e. no longer a natural, but a man-made setting.

    Are we close yet? :)
     
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