Change your fate

krustak

New Member
Spanish
How could I translate "Change your fate" into Greek? Is It correct to say "Alakseh ti Mira"? Please, if you know greek, help mee
I want the translation for "Change your fate/Destiny"
 
  • Apollodorus

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Assuming that fate can be changed, you could say something like "alazo ti mira mu" (αλλάζω τη μοίρα μου, infinitive) or "álakse ti mira su" (άλλαξε τη μοίρα σου, imperative) that would be equivalent to Spanish "cambia tu destino".
     
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    krustak

    New Member
    Spanish
    Assuming that fate can be changed, you could say something like "alazo ti mira mu" (αλλάζω τη μοίρα μου, infinitive) or "álakse ti mira su" (άλλαξε τη μοίρα σου, imperative) that would be equivalent to Spanish "cambia tu destino".
    Thank you very much Apollodorus
    So, is it more accurate to say "álakse ti mira su" to express a command than "álakse ti mira"? What's the difference between "álakse ti mira" and "álakse ti mira su"?

    Thanks.

    Assuming that fate can be changed, you could say something like "alazo ti mira mu" (αλλάζω τη μοίρα μου, infinitive) or "álakse ti mira su" (άλλαξε τη μοίρα σου, imperative) that would be equivalent to Spanish "cambia tu destino".
    And is It correct to say "Alakseh"? What is the difference between "Alakseh" and "álakse"? Is the "h" correct?
    Thanks again.
     

    Perseas

    Senior Member
    Thank you very much Apollodorus
    So, is it more accurate to say "álakse ti mira su" to express a command than "álakse ti mira"? What's the difference between "álakse ti mira" and "álakse ti mira su"?
    "Άλλαξε τη μοίρα" means "change the fate" (imperative singular), while "άλλαξε τη μοίρα σου" means "change your fate" (again imperative singular).

    "Άλλαξε το πεπρωμένο σου" would be another option.
    πεπρωμένο - Ελληνοαγγλικό Λεξικό WordReference.com

    And is It correct to say "Alakseh"? What is the difference between "Alakseh" and "álakse"? Is the "h" correct?
    In Greek letters it's "άλλαξε", so I don't think 'h' would make a sense. I'd use "allakse".
     

    Apollodorus

    Senior Member
    English UK
    And is It correct to say "Alakseh"? What is the difference between "Alakseh" and "álakse"? Is the "h" correct?
    Thanks again.

    It’s OK to transliterate Greek “άλλαξε” as álakseh as long as you bear in mind that the final “h” is silent (i.e., not pronounced) as in Spanish “hermano” (/ermano/) - and that the "e" is short.

    Otherwise, as @Perseas says, adding a voiced (pronounced) “h” like Spanish “x/j” or Greek “χ” to άλλαξε would make no sense and is incorrect.
     
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    Apollodorus

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Yes, it is present indicative. I was just thinking that the first person singular of the present indicative can also serve as infinitive, so "(I) change" would be the same as "(to) change", depending on what the original sentence was.

    Personally, I tend to take the infinitive as the basic form of a verb. If we look at the verbal form normally used in dictionary entries, English “[to] change” (infinitive) corresponds to Greek “αλλάζω” (allázo). So, present indicative “αλλάζω” functions as infinitive.
     
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    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    An infinitive is "not finite" (it doesn't change according to person or number), so to say that αλλάζω "functions as an infinitive" is meaningless.


    Modern Greek/Lesson 04.2 - Wikibooks, open books for an open world
    There is no infinitive in modern Greek. For naming a verb, the first-person singular of the present tense is used as a generic term. For example, we refer to the verb γράφω, to write.
     

    Apollodorus

    Senior Member
    English UK
    For example, we refer to the verb γράφω, to write.

    That's what I was trying to say. Dictionaries use the Greek present as equivalent to infinitive in other languages. English "to write" is Greek "γράφω", Spanish "cambiar" is Greek "αλλάζω", etc.

    If somebody asks how to say English “to change” in Greek, the answer is “αλλάζω”. The Greek present indicative is here equated with the English infinitive which agrees with the first person singular of the present indicative.

    It is in this sense that the Greek present “functions as infinitive”, “infinitive” being used in the sense of “basic form of a verb” or “that form of a verb which expresses simply the notion of the verb” (Oxford English Dictionary).
     
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    dirida

    Member
    Greek
    Coming late to the conversation so all have been said, both άλλαξε τη μοίρα σου & άλλαξε το πεπρωμένο σου are totally accurate.

    Just commented to say that also φτιάξε τη μοίρα σου is kind of more modernish(?) and equivalent as it indicates personal actions, which means changes. It simply depends on the formality of the context to tell which expression fits best :)
     

    Apollodorus

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Just commented to say that also φτιάξε τη μοίρα σου is kind of more modernish(?) and equivalent as it indicates personal actions, which means changes.
    If fate (< Latin fātum, lit. “that which has been spoken”) μοίρα (< Greek “portion given”) or πεπρωμένο (< Greek “that which is (has been) given”) is the principle, power, or agency by which events are unalterably predetermined, then it can’t really be changed. We can make changes in ourselves or in our life, but those changes would have to be within the paradigms determined by fate. In other words, by definition, if something can be changed, it isn’t fate.

    Might the “modernish” “φτιάξε τη μοίρα σου” be a better choice?
     
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