chanson aux lèvres

Tyler_ynk

New Member
France / French
Hi again,

I'm glad I know wordreference for all these expressions that might or might not be translated directly, but still, we all keep building the date base.
So, I would need some help to translate "chanson aux lèvres" in such a sentence as :
"Désormais alerte et guillerette, chanson aux lèvres, arrosoir à la main, elle vaquait en ses jardins." (Jean Rambaud, "Emmanuelle")

Well, it just means that she is on the verge to sing, wiling to, or so happy that the next thing we'd expect would be for her to start singing.

Anyways, all I need is an equivalent expression (idiomatic if there's one), whatever the profound meaning.

Thank you and to all who spend time answering.

Tyler
 
  • Niemand

    Member
    French/English
    I have to disagree. "A song on her lips" is not only correct, it is the most frequently used expression.

    (I never even heard of a song "in a voice" before)
     

    Tyler_ynk

    New Member
    France / French
    Dommage que vous ne soyez pas d'accord !
    Who do I believe ?
    Anyway, thank you Wildan1 und Niemand, I'll keep both suggestions and see what my professor says.

    Take care
     

    FAC13

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    I say believe Niemand - that is the correct answer in my view.

    An alternative would be "with a song in her heart" - that would imply that she isn't actually singing but feels very happy. That doesn't fit the text we have been asked to translate though (in my opinion!).
     

    wildan1

    Moderando ma non troppo (French-English, CC Mod)
    I say believe Niemand - that is the correct answer in my view.

    An alternative would be "with a song in her heart" - that would imply that she isn't actually singing but feels very happy. That doesn't fit the text we have been asked to translate though (in my opinion!).
    Yes, song in her heart rings even truer than anything I or Niemand have said. "With a Song in my Heart" is actually the name of an old film (named after an even older and famous song), so maybe that's why it sounds so familiar.

    Somehow "on her lips" just sounds like a word-for-word translation to me. I would have a word on the tip of my tongue if I were about to say it or were trying to remember it, but songs don't linger on my lips...
     

    wildan1

    Moderando ma non troppo (French-English, CC Mod)
    humming/muttering a song
    humming a song means singing the melody with the mouth closed, without the words (fredonner ? -- strangely, this word as a verb is not in the WF dictionary) -- can that be the equivalent of une chanson aux lèvres ?

    muttering is speaking under one's breath, usually to complain, but it would not apply to a song
     

    archijacq

    Senior Member
    french France
    il y a plein de choses qui ne se disent pas, et pourtant...
    Wikipedia:
    "Tyrone would enter the scene, muttering a song, and, spying Gladys on the bench, would sit next to her... "
     

    overdue

    Member
    Californian English
    I know this is an old post, but why not keep "on the verge of singing"? Or "ready to burst into into song"?
    And @Niemand: not to flame or troll, but if English isn't your native language, isn't there a chance that you simply haven't HEARD the line wildan1 offered?
    I for one have, whereas I have never "a song on her lips."
    You know, there are numerous regional varieties of English.....
     
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