Chasseurs à cheval

Discussion in 'French-English Vocabulary / Vocabulaire Français-Anglais' started by Harek, Aug 20, 2004.

  1. Harek

    Harek Senior Member

    Canada
    Russia
    How do you translate "chasseurs à cheval"? It's from a 1793 text (lol), and those words are supposed to be a military title. In fact, here's the whole sentence: "En 1793 il venoit d'etre nommé lieutentant-colonel des chasseurs à cheval de la légion du Nord"
    Don't ask me what I need that for :D
     
  2. A.D. Burris Member

    Colorado
    USA/English
    Well, doesn't that literally mean "mounted hunters", or perhaps, more accurately, "mounted infantry"? But if "chasseur à cheval" is more of a position title, like "gendarme", maybe you should leave the term untranslated. I think a good translation might be "In 1793, he was to be named lietenant-colonel of the mounted infantry of the North Legion". Pardon me if I've misunderstood the meaning of the Old French "venoit".
     
  3. ishatar

    ishatar Senior Member

    Grenoble
    France, French
    Maybe I'm just grossly mistaken, but If infantry is mounted, don't they become cavalry?

    "He was to be named lieutenant-colonel". Hum... "venoit" seems to be Old French for "venait" (troisième personne du singulier du verbe "venir" à l'imparfait), so I think it would be more like "He had just been named lieutenant-colonel".

    Sorry for being that pernickety. I'm very attached to be precise. ;)
     
  4. Addyblue

    Addyblue Senior Member

    Toulouse, France
    France, French native speaker
    Selon mon dictionnaire Robert & Collins,
    "chasseur à cheval" = (Hist Mil.) cavalryman
    "les chasseurs à cheval" = the calvary
     
  5. Julien Member

    Lyon, France
    French, France
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but could the english equivalent be something like: dragon ?? or dragoon ??
     
  6. Harek

    Harek Senior Member

    Canada
    Russia
    Hey, thanks a lot, man! ;)
     
  7. Harek

    Harek Senior Member

    Canada
    Russia
    Since you've answered my first question, I thought maybe you'd help me with another one.. This one is..ummm... more difficult, I think, because I asked one woman from France and she started laughing, saying she had no idea what that sentence (in old French) meant :) But nevertheless, here goes:

    "un jugement du 19 frimaire an 2, rendu par la Commission militaire établie près des deux armées, a déclaré Barbier du Fay convaincu d'avoir porté l'état de l'étape de sa troupe à soixante hommes et à soixante chevaux au-dessus de l'effectif; d'avoir abusé de sa qualité de supérieur pour engager son maréchal-des-logis Guerinet, à toucher l'étape de ces soixante hommes et soixante chevaux"

    So.. lol.. the French woman was able to help me with everything except for the bolded part. I'd appreciate your help immensely!

    Harek :)
     
  8. Addyblue

    Addyblue Senior Member

    Toulouse, France
    France, French native speaker
    I'm actually a WOMAN... :)
     
  9. Addyblue

    Addyblue Senior Member

    Toulouse, France
    France, French native speaker
    Voici ce que j'ai pu trouvé dans mes dictionnaires:

    "engager à" = to urge to, to encourage to
    "maréchal-des-logis" = sergeant
    "Guerinet" = the sergeant's surname
    "toucher" = (1) se servir d'un aiguillon pour faire avancer un animal (ex : toucher les boeufs) - (2) entrer en relation avec quelqu'un, communiquer avec lui - (3) apporter des changements, des modifications - (4) (classique) frapper, exciter avec le fouet, humilier
    "l'étape" ??? La seule chose que j'ai trouvée c'est : zone des "étapes" = nom donné, jusqu'à la 2ème guerre mondiale, à la zone des arrières à l'échelon de l'armée.

    :confused: Does that help??? :confused:
     
  10. Harek

    Harek Senior Member

    Canada
    Russia
    Hey Addyblue,

    Hehehe, sorry about the "man" part, it's a North American thing I guess :rolleyes: (yeah, even for women sometimes). But seriously, thanks a lot for your help! :) The meaning is much clearer with your explanation!
     
  11. Addyblue

    Addyblue Senior Member

    Toulouse, France
    France, French native speaker
    You're welcome!
    I'm glad it's clearer to you because I'm still not sure about the whole translation. But I guess you have more context to understand what it's all about.
     
  12. aurayfrance Senior Member

    France, French, English and Spanish
    This sentence is pretty difficult, even for a French person... :) I hope you have understood that the first part meant that this man has mentioned 60 men with horses who, in fact, had never existed. His goal is explained is the bold part of your text: he wanted to get their pay. Misusing his authority, he incited his sergeant to get the pay of these non existent soldiers. Does it make sense for you?
     
  13. Harek

    Harek Senior Member

    Canada
    Russia
    Woooww, AurayFrance, omg, that makes so much sense! Thanks SO much for that! Could you please elaborate on the first part (it's clear already, but I might be missing something without knowing it). I think I misunderstood my first French helper about the first part (way back then) - she said that the accused guy kind of brought the size of his troupe above the allowed number - but the "non-existent" soldiers make it so much more logical! Thanks a bunch!
     
  14. Indabob New Member

    English
    Thanks AurayFrance ., now even i understand it!


    .P.sThis is the oldest post! page 8727!
     

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