chatta / chatter [reggae chatta king Beenie Man]

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TellDemISaidDat

Senior Member
Italiano
Hello everyone,

I need help with the term chatta.

[...] on top of all that, the title track featured reggae chatta king Beenie Man.

Urban Dictionary provides a definition of chatta as follows:

A name you call someone who needs to be quiet.

Beenie Man, the Reggae King who needs to shut the :warn:fuck up. Sounds a little awful if I had to translate this. :D

Is this really necessary to even take into consideration when it comes to a translation? I mean, I am turning this review into Italian and I do not know whether it is actually worth translating. Is this term used to reinforce the description of Beenie Man or could it mean something which has a sense?

Again, the background is T.I.'s first album, I'm Serious, which was not a huge commercial success.

The review is always for RapReviews.com which you find HERE.

Your help is always appreciated.

TellDemISaidDat
 
  • Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I'm not sure what "reggae chatta" is, but the sentence says that Beenie Man so good at reggae chatta that he deserves to be called the king of it (compare to queen of soul Aretha Franklin).
     

    MattiasNYC

    Senior Member
    Swedish
    Hello, Beryl, so it's pratically a DJ. Thank you a lot!

    TellDemISaidDat

    I think the contemporary view of a DJ is a person who is playing back prerecorded music for an audience, using vinyl records or digital sources. If I understand the links and terms correctly (above) then that's not what "reggae chatta" is. The latter seems to be an actual musical performance.
     

    TellDemISaidDat

    Senior Member
    Italiano
    MattiasNYC,

    Should I keep the original term when translating or what? Because seen that this is a particular noun it probably has no other similar translation in other languages. In the Wikipedia link Beryl posted they actually say deejaying is a synonym for chatting and toasting.

    TellDemISaidDat
     
    Last edited:

    MattiasNYC

    Senior Member
    Swedish
    MattiasNYC,

    Should I keep the original term when translating or what? Because seen that this is a particular noun it probably has no other similar translation in other languages. In the Wikipedia link Beryl posted they actually say deejaying is a synonym for chatting and toasting.

    TellDemISaidDat
    Well the article Beryl linked to says two things:

    "Deejay (alternatively spelled DJ) is a term in Jamaican music for a reggae or dancehall musician who sings and "toasts" to an instrumental riddim (rhythm)."

    and

    "Toasting, chatting, or deejaying is the act of talking or chanting, usually in a monotone melody, over a rhythm or beat by a deejay."

    So I think that in this particular subculture the meaning is different from that of what mainstream pop-music consumers think of when they hear the term "DJ". If I talk to virtually anyone I know, even most in the music industry, they will take "DJ" to mean someone who simply plays back music for people to dance to, in a club or restaurant or at a rave or other party. They will usually not think of that person as performing vocally, rhythmically, to the music they're playing back. So again, to my understanding it is distinctly different. I'm also guessing that this is true worldwide, with "DJ" generally being understood as I described it and not the way it is applied to "toasters".

    As for translating to Italian I really have no idea what would be more suitable. Perhaps you could use "toasting" instead as it would probably lead to fewer misunderstandings, or just leave it the way the Jamaicans say it and then just explain what it is separately.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Seems like a word that could go from language to language without actually being translated! Unless of course there is an Italian word that carries the exact meaning. This seems unlikely, so all readers will need to do the same kind of intensive research that Beryl did to understand, whatever word is used. Might as well stick with chatta* - it doesn't even look English anyway :D I would not get the true meaning even if someone had substituted "DJing and toasting" in the English version :eek:

    *With a footnote like this, explaining the term.
     

    TellDemISaidDat

    Senior Member
    Italiano
    MattiasNYC, JulianStuart,

    OK thanks. I kept chatta and explained the term in brackets because I cannot think of any Italian words (and there are not any 100%) which convey something like this.

    TellDemISaidDat
     

    tonyspeed

    Senior Member
    English & Creole - Jamaica
    Chatta seems to be a term that is a strange Englishized combination of a Jamaican term for the act of doing the type "rapping" we invented : chat and the English postfix : "er". I have never heard this term until now. In Jamaica, we usually use the term "deejay" for the person and the act. Usually, "chat" is only used as a verb, never as a noun.
     
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