Chaud patate

smallseb

Senior Member
Français - France
Hi all,

I'm wondering what's the idiom sentence to translate (if there is one) "chaud patate" which means basically a particular difficulty... It's fam. language, maybe I'll make one examples to make myself clear.

People are discussing an exam which was pretty difficult. One say to the other C'était chaud patate! (It was tough!)

If anybody can help... I'd be glad, otherwise that's not such a big deal!
 
  • sarah82

    Senior Member
    French-France
    Bonjour smallseb, je n'ai jamais entendu cette expression !

    Maybe an English-speaker can give us very colloquial expressions to say "it was tough" ? :)
     

    allezallez

    Senior Member
    Am. English
    in english, a "hot potato", is:

    a controversial question or issue that involves unpleasant or dangerous consequences for anyone dealing with it
     

    smallseb

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    Yes, we have the same translation in French which is "patate chaude" for "hot potato" and not "chaud patate" ;)
     
    Last edited:

    sarah82

    Senior Member
    French-France
    Non, smallseb dit bien "chaud patate", et pas patate chaude ou chaude patate.

    It's an expression, not very commonly used, but "c'était chaud patate" means something like "it was really hard" (smallseb gave the example of an exam).
    Could any English-speaker provide some expressions, colloquial ones, to say "it was really hard".
    chaud patate sounds funny in French, and I guess he's looking for something funny in English as well, not necessarily with a potato in it :)
     

    allezallez

    Senior Member
    Am. English
    to signify that something is very very difficult or arduous, you could say that it is like pulling teeth
     

    Veentea

    Senior Member
    English - US
    You could take a colloquial expression for easy and negate it. For example: "That exam was no piece of cake." Not sure it's what you want though...
     

    smallseb

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    Yes, it is! but, I know that idiomatic expression "not a piece of cake" and it fit perfectly perfectly. But I want something stronger, or more familiar!
     

    babyoyster

    New Member
    Cantonese, Hong Kong
    Yes, it is! but, I know that idiomatic expression "not a piece of cake" and it fit perfectly perfectly. But I want something stronger, or more familiar!
    But my friend told me, it means, "I can't wait to jump into it." Like when I invited her to a cool thing, I asked her, if you're in. She'd answer me this when she's totally in! Correct me if I'm mistaken.


    Thanks,
    BCH
     

    smallseb

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    But my friend told me, it means, "I can't wait to jump into it." Like when I invited her to a cool thing, I asked her, if you're in. She'd answer me this when she's totally in! Correct me if I'm mistaken.


    Thanks,
    BCH
    "Chaud patate" is working in this sentence too. You could either say it as I explained in my primary example, or you could also say it if you're really excited about something you're about to do.
     

    cavinsays

    New Member
    English
    Old thread I know but I wanted to add that you can also refer to someone in this way. I had to drive 6 hours and back to get my French visa today and when I told my Parisian friend he said, "t'es chaud patate!"
    From what I see here and in this context this must mean, "you're (a) tough (guy)!"/"You're serious about what you want to accomplish!"
     
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