Chaunier

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I am unsure of the English translation of the following sentence:
"Au 17e siècle, les producteurs de chaux portent également le nom de « chauniers ».
I believe it to be "In the 17th century, lime producers were equally known by the name "[this is the point at which I am stuck]" I believe it has something to do with operating the ovens to reduce the lime, but I am not sure.

Your opinions would be greatly appreciated..
 
  • FranParis

    Banned
    Français - France
    Oui, les chauniers était ceux qui s'occupaient des fours à chaux.

    However, I couldn't find a good translation in English.

    The term “lime,” refers primarily to six chemicals produced by the calcination of high-purity calcitic or dolomitic limestone followed by hydration where necessary. They are (1) quicklime, calcium oxide (CaO); (2) hydrated lime, calcium hydroxide [Ca(OH)2]; (3) dolomitic quicklime (CaO.MgO); two types of dolomitic hydrate, (4) type N [Ca(OH)2.MgO] and (5) type S [Ca(OH)2.Mg(OH)2]; and (6) dead-burned dolomite. Nondolomitic quicklime and hydrated lime are also called high-calcium lime. Lime also can be produced from a variety of calcareous materials such as aragonite, chalk, coral, marble, and shell. Lime is also regenerated; that is, produced as a byproduct, by paper mills, carbide plants, and water treatment plants;
     

    L'irlandais

    Senior Member
    Ireland: English-speaking ♂
    I believe it to be "In the 17th century, lime producers were equally known by the name "[this is the point at which I am stuck]" I believe it has something to do with operating the ovens to reduce the lime, but I am not sure.
    Your opinions would be greatly appreciated...
    Hello Kenneth,
    Archijacq has put his finger on it. So my suggestion is to keep the French expression, as there doesn't seem to be a colloquialism in English :
    In the 17th century, lime producers were equally known by the name « chauniers » (lime-burners).
     
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