Che ¿Procede de los ancestros hebreos?

Mr.Dent

Senior Member
English American
En el libro "Allá Arriba En La Mesa Del Feca" de Ben Molar, Academia Porteña Del Lunfardo, Buenos Aires, 2004, pagina 33, Ben Molar dice que hay investigadores que sostienen que che procede de los ancestros hebreos, los sefardíes valencianos, transcribiendo algunos salmos que acreditan que el che se usaba en lugar de usted en Israel hace tres mil años.
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¿Es cierto? Yo no puedo encontrar evidencia que la palabra "che" viene de los hebreos.
I came across this quote in a discussion about the etymology of the word "che".
 
  • Circunflejo

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Castilla
    There are many theories about the origin of che. That could be another one but to say that there are researches without specifying what researches are you talking about doesn't give any credibility to the theory.
     

    Mr.Dent

    Senior Member
    English American
    Thanks for your reply.
    This was the first time I heard such a theory, and I have not been able to find such instances in the Bible; I wonder how he got such an idea.
     

    symposium

    Senior Member
    Italian - Italy
    If by "che" you mean the recurrent Argentinian interjection, another theory is that it comes from Italian "cioè" (pronounced almost as "che") which means "that is", and that just like "like" in English is another common interjection. You probably know that a massive number of Italians migrated to Argentina.
     

    Mr.Dent

    Senior Member
    English American
    If by "che" you mean the recurrent Argentinian interjection, another theory is that it comes from Italian "cioè" (pronounced almost as "che") which means "that is", and that just like "like" in English is another common interjection. You probably know that a massive number of Italians migrated to Argentina.
    Thanks for your reply.
    Yes, I am aware of that theory. Other theories hold that it comes from Guaraní. But this theory of it coming from the ancient Hebrews struck me as so novel that I had to see if there was anything to it.
     

    Sardokan1.0

    Senior Member
    Sardu / Italianu
    In Sardinian language we use the same interjection of Argentinians.

    Written as "ce!" or "cee!" (identical pronunciation of "che"), other variations of the same interjection are "cess! / cesu! / cessu! / ess! / esu!

    They are surely shortened versions of "Jesus!"

    In fact we can find another popular interjection : "Jesu Maria!" -> with the shortened versions "Essu Maria! / Esu Maria! / Cesu Maria!

    P.S.
    It's possible that this expression arrived in Argentina with the Sardinian sailors when Buenos Aires was founded, according to the sources there were many Sardinians among those who discovered the area where the city was founded. The city was also named after the Sardinian "Nostra Segnora de Bon'Aria", the Holy Virgin venerated in the city of Cagliari (southern Sardinia) since the Middle Ages.

    Compare also with the English expression "gee"

    gee
    (dʒiː)
    interj
    informal
    US and Canadian a mild exclamation of surprise, admiration, etc. Also: gee whizz
    [C20: euphemism for Jesus]
     
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    Penyafort

    Senior Member
    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    It is used within Spain too, typically by Valencians. To the extent that che (or xe in Catalan) can be used sometimes as a synonym of Valencian: el club che. No real need to search for uncommon origins, in my opinion.

    The origin could either be a variation of the ancient ce! [tse], used to call people, or from the Catalan xic, pronounced xec or xeic in southern Catalonia, where it's also used as a vocative.
     
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