cheat someone out of their livelihood

Lucy 234

Senior Member
Korean
Hi all,
I saw this sentence but I could understand the part "cheat someone out of their livelihood". Could you help me understand it? Thank you in advance.

"Don't cheat someone out of their livelihood just to haggle for a few more dollars off."
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It implies that you should not try to get the price of something down so low that the person selling it makes no profit, and thus is “cheated out of his livelihood”.
     

    Lucy 234

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you for your help. How do you understand "cheating me out of my livelihood" in the sentence "You steals my old customers. Isn’t this cheating me out of my livelihood?"
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I’ve just explained what I understand that sentence to imply. You seem to have leapt from haggling over a price to stealing old customers! But there’s no mention whatsoever of that.
     

    Lucy 234

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Sorry, I didn't express clearly.
    "You steals my old customers. Isn’t this cheating me out of my livelihood?" is another sentence in which I'd like to know what the part "cheating me out of my livelihood" means. I think maybe it can express different meanings in different context.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    It's an idiomatic phrase: If you cheat someone out of something, you take it from them by dishonest means.

    He cheated me out of my bonus (he promised to give me a bonus if I got the job done the job quickly, but found some excuse not to give it to me.

    He tricked me out of my money (he tricked me in some way, and took my money - or the money he owed me).
     
    Last edited:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top