check-in luggage?

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raymondaliasapollyon

Senior Member
Chinese
Hi,

Do you think "check-in luggage" is natural English (AmE or BrE)?
I find "checked baggage" and "checked-in luggage " ok in American and British English respectively, but I'm not sure about
"check-in luggage".

Some recognize a difference between "check-in luggage" and "checked-in luggage / checked baggage", as if the former refers to luggage that is going to be checked in.

When you are packing, is it natural to say "I have to put these items in the checked baggage because they are banned in hand luggage."?

I'd appreciate your help.
 
  • Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I occasionally hear "check-in baggage" in American English, but the usual distinction is between checked and carry-on baggage.

    When I did a Web search for the phrase "check-in baggage" on a few airline sites, most of the hits were sentences such as this on aa.com (American Airlines):
    Traveling soon? Learn about airports, check-in, baggage, clubs and security – all the important information you'll need for the day you travel.
    in which the words "check-in" and "baggage" appear next to each other, but not as a single phrase.
     

    raymondaliasapollyon

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I occasionally hear "check-in baggage" in American English, but the usual distinction is between checked and carry-on baggage.

    When I did a Web search for the phrase "check-in baggage" on a few airline sites, most of the hits were sentences such as this on aa.com (American Airlines):


    in which the words "check-in" and "baggage" appear next to each other, but not as a single phrase.
    Thank you for your feedback.
    Could you answer the following question?

    When you are packing, is it natural to say "I have to put these items in the checked baggage because they are banned in hand luggage."?
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    No. Not for me. "I have to put these in my case because I can't take them in my cabin bag." I have never used the phrase "checked baggage" and it is meaningless to me.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I would probably say, "I'm putting these in my suitcase because they're not allowed in carry-on." The presumption is that anything that's a suitcase – and anyone I'm talking to – will understand that the suitcase will be checked in.
     

    raymondaliasapollyon

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I would probably say, "I'm putting these in my suitcase because they're not allowed in carry-on." The presumption is that anything that's a suitcase – and anyone I'm talking to – will understand that the suitcase will be checked in.

    Would you say "I'm putting these in my check-in baggage because they're not allowed in carry-on." ?
     

    raymondaliasapollyon

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    No. Not for me. "I have to put these in my case because I can't take them in my cabin bag." I have never used the phrase "checked baggage" and it is meaningless to me.
    How about the following?

    "I have to put these in my checked-in luggage because I can't take them in my cabin bag."
    "I have to put these in my check-in luggage because I can't take them in my cabin bag."
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Would you say "I'm putting these in my check-in baggage because they're not allowed in carry-on." ?
    I might because I've worked for a long time with an airline that uses that term, but most people wouldn't. As I mentioned, most people refer to their luggage, not baggage – or they're specific, e.g. suitcase, backpack, duffel bag.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    I would suggest "checked luggage."
    That doesn't work for me. I check in. My hold luggage is dropped at the check-in. It doesn't get checked by anybody until it has disappeared along the belt, so I've no reason to call it "checked". Is there an AE/BE difference?
     

    raymondaliasapollyon

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    That doesn't work for me. I check in. My hold luggage is dropped at the check-in. It doesn't get checked by anybody until it has disappeared along the belt, so I've no reason to call it "checked". Is there an AE/BE difference?
    My questions involve a few parameters, e.g. baggage vs. luggage, check vs. check in (the former is notably American), and checked vs. checked-in vs. check-in.

    For the above reason, recognizing you're British, I have prepared the following options, neither of which involves "checked" or "baggage":

    When you are packing, would you say
    "I have to put these in my checked-in luggage because I can't take them in my cabin bag"; or
    "I have to put these in my check-in luggage because I can't take them in my cabin bag."?
     
    Last edited:

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    neither of which involves "checked"
    One includes "checked", the other includes "check". I do not check or check in luggage or baggage. As I said before, I check in at the check-in, and after I have done so, I am checked in. My baggage doesn't check in, it gets dropped or dropped off. It gets checked somewhere in the baggage handling area by an X-ray machine and its operator, but that has nothing to do with "check" as in "check in".
     

    raymondaliasapollyon

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I would suggest "checked luggage."
    Some people, many of them British, say "checked-in luggage" refers to luggage that has been checked in.

    If "checked baggage / luggage " is the usual AmE counterpart of "checked-in luggage", do you think that "checked baggage (or luggage)" necessarily refers to baggage that has been checked in? Can it refer to luggage / baggage that is going to be checked in?
     
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