cheeky selfie

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seeeker

Senior Member
I am not sure about the phrase "cheeky selfie" that I came across in the following (made-up) sentence in a description of an adventure game:

You have to decide whether you want to take a cheeky (but safe) selfie with a toucan for points or you want to go for more points by fighting with another contestant.

Hope to find the meaning of the said phrase here.
 
  • seeeker

    Senior Member
    cheek•y /ˈtʃiki/ adj., -i•er, -i•est.
    1. rude or disrespectful; insolent.
    Does that help?
    Thank you for your answer, RM1(SS).

    The given meaning does not seem to fit here. I am not sure about how a selfie can be rude in this context. The game is all about enjoying the vacations.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Yes, I think in this context cheeky means light-hearted and funny/amusing.

    Here's a definition returned by Google:

    British
    impudent or irreverent, typically in an endearing or amusing way.
    "a cheeky grin"

    I think that word is used more seriously in British English than American English. If we were to want a more serious meaning, we would choose a different word. Do you know where the game was written?
     

    seeeker

    Senior Member
    Yes, I think in this context cheeky means light-hearted and funny/amusing.

    Here's a definition returned by Google:

    British
    impudent or irreverent, typically in an endearing or amusing way.
    "a cheeky grin"

    I think that word is used more seriously in British English than American English. If we were to want a more serious meaning, we would choose a different word. Do you know where the game was written?
    Thank you for your answer, kentix. This makes things much clearer to me.
     

    seeeker

    Senior Member
    Yes, I think in this context cheeky means light-hearted and funny/amusing.

    Here's a definition returned by Google:

    British
    impudent or irreverent, typically in an endearing or amusing way.
    "a cheeky grin"

    I think that word is used more seriously in British English than American English. If we were to want a more serious meaning, we would choose a different word. Do you know where the game was written?
    Sorry, kentix. I should have mentioned in the reply that the game was most probably written in the US.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I have to disagree with that a bit. Although I don't personally use the word cheeky myself there are 398 examples in the COCA American English database. I was looking through them trying to make sure they aren't British people talking in American media but one of the quotes is from Reese Witherspoon who is an American actress from the Southern U.S. Another was Kathie Lee Gifford. And there weren't as many that were "cheeky grin" as I expected. Of course you don't know where these people might have picked up phrases later in life. It wouldn't surprise me to find out Reese Witherspoon has acted with British actors in various movies over the years. She could have acquired its usage that way. But I did find a local Denver reporter using it when referring to a local Denver (via Nevada) two-brother comedy duo. " In Colorado they made the cheeky documentary-style video series 'Rainbow Chasers'..."
     
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