cheese on hot plate/hot-plated cheese

boozer

Senior Member
Bulgarian
Hi all,

I'm doing a friend of mine a favour translating his restaurant menu into English. It's a nightmare because most of the dishes are Bulgarian and translating word-for-word would not give anyone any idea of what actually they were ordering. On top of that, I myself have limited understanding of many of the recipes. So don't ask me for more context. :D

Now there's this typically Bulgarian-Greek-Turkish kind of cheese that we cover with flour and heat on a hot plate.

If I say "yellow cheese on hot plate" people might think it will be brought to them on the hot plate, together with it, which is not the case.

So I'm thinking of "hot-plated yellow cheese" which, in my view, gives a good idea of what you're getting without suggesting that the "hot plate" itself is also coming. :)

The problem is that I already know what the dish is and cannot decide what the phrase would tell me if I didn't.

Any comments and observations are welcome.
 
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  • boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    NO, my friends. :)
    That little I know - it's not my favourite "kashkaval pane" or breaded fried (yellow) cheese.

    It's a different recipe where no frying or fat is involved. The cheese is only heated on a hot plate...
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Pan-Warmed or Seared [supply your own adjective here: possibly the type of cheese] Cheese, e.g. Pan-Warmed Goat's Cheese, Seared Goat's Cheese.:)
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    Ummm, there's one more complication, Copy. No pan is used. :) It's a clay plate.

    The Bulgarian version says "Kashkaval (yellow cheese) on a plate".

    But I guess "seared" is as good as it gets. To hell with the plate :D

    Thank you both.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    A "hot plate" (at least in American English) is the name for a portable electric burner (perhaps for camping or for use in a hotel room or very tiny apartment) so if you want to go with the plate, you should change it to "heated plate" otherwise it will sound as if your kitchen is not well equipped. ;)
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    A "hot plate" (at least in American English) is the name for a portable electric burner (perhaps for camping or for use in a hotel room or very tiny apartment) so if you want to go with the plate, you should change it to "heated plate" otherwise it will sound as if your kitchen is not well equipped. ;)
    Thanks, Myridon. In fact, I am aware of this (which probably means that it's not restricted to AE) but I was hoping it could be interpreted more literally. :)
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    If it's not served with the plate, does it matter what is used to heat it? I don't think you need to include the cooking utensil in the description unless it somehow changes the way the cheese tastes or looks when it is service.

    How about "Flour-dusted warmed (type of cheese) cheese"?

    Is it actually hot or just warn whem it's served? (As a side question, how do you eat this cheese -- with a fork?)

    Is there a picture of this somewhere that we can see? I'm having trouble picturing what it looks like. Is it brown on the outside when it's served?
     
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    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    It's hot. Actually, this kind of cheese has a way of getting liquefied when it's hot. So what actually happens is that the flour outside gets scorched and crusted while inside the cheese is "molten" :)

    And yes, the utensil in (or rather on) which it is cooked does change the taste - all clay pots do. This is why in Bulgarian it's part of the dish's name and this is why I wanted to somehow include it.

    But anyway, I've already given it and it says "seared". Thanks for your help, James. :)
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    Oh, no, UE. :) The pigeons are already past caring but I know they would never have said that. In fact, they vehemently object. :D

    I can't use the name of an Indian dish that very few people even know here to describe a Bulgarian one. Fritters are fried too.

    But the pigeons express their gratitude for your willingness to kindly assist. :)
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    As Copyright said to me in a private message, "clay-fired" would make a lot of sense in American English. "Clay-fired baked cheese" would work for me. (I know it's too late, but just in case you have another friend who needs to translate the same dish sometime... :) )
     
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