chez l'apprenti

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jilliane

New Member
Canada~English
Hello, I am unsure of the meaning of chez in the following sentence:

Le compagnon doit vérifier, chez l’apprenti, lors de l’analyse d’un circuit à courant continu ou alternatif monté en série ou en parallèle et possédant une charge résistive, inductive ou capacitive

I put it as with.

The journeyman must check the following, with the apprentice, when analyzing an AC or DC circuit constructed in parallel or series and possessing a resistive, inductive or capacitive load:

Merci!
 
  • french4beth

    Senior Member
    US-English
    That looks good, jilliane.

    In Grand dico terminologique, they showed "connected in series" for "monter en série" and "connected in parallel" for "monter en parallèle" but I'm not a technical expert...
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    jilliane said:
    Hello, I am unsure of the meaning of chez in the following sentence:

    Le compagnon doit vérifier, chez l’apprenti, lors de l’analyse d’un circuit à courant continu ou alternatif monté en série ou en parallèle et possédant une charge résistive, inductive ou capacitive

    I put it as with.

    The journeyman must check the following, with the apprentice, when analyzing an AC or DC circuit constructed in parallel or series and possessing a resistive, inductive or capacitive load:

    Merci!
    I think your sentence is not complete, is it? There's no object of "vérifier" given. It doesn't make sense to me as it is. Anyway, I would translate "chez" as "in" here. The worker must check in the apprentice...(his attention to detail, the proper use of something, etc)

    One reason that this is difficult to translate is that the French sentence doesn't go on to say what is being checked.
     

    Monsieur Hoole

    Senior Member
    Canada English
    On the part of the apprentice?? I'm assuming that the compagnon is in some way evaluating the work of the apprentice, otherwise it doesn't make a lot of sense:)
     

    slewis

    Member
    UK (English)
    He can check on behalf of the apprentice ... [implies: because the apprentice doesnt have the expertise to check it on his own]

    or

    He can check (up) on the apprentice ... [implies: to monitor the quality of the work of the apprentice]

    or

    He can check with the apprentice ... [implies: to obtain the opinion of the apprentice]

    Connected in series/parallel is correct in English.

    Steve
     

    jilliane

    New Member
    Canada~English
    Thanks,
    that sentence was followed by a list of bulleted points, which I guess would be the objects that timpeace was looking for. here are a few.

    -sa capacité d’analyser un circuit à courant continu monté en série ou en parallèle et possédant une charge résistive

    -sa capacité d’analyser un circuit à courant continu monté en série ou en parallèle et possédant une charge inductive

    and so on.

    I think that with or in would make sense depending on how collaberative the effort was meant to be.
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    This confirms what I thought. I don't think that "with" is the right translation. If you check with someone it means that you ask them "is this true" (as slewis says above).

    I would translate this as "the overseer must check in (the work of) the apprentice .... his ability to analyse a circuit...etc"

    To check with the apprentice would mean the overseer went up to him and said "have you got the ability to analyse a circuit?" and I'm sure that's not what's meant.
     

    Kelly B

    Senior Member
    USA English
    It might even be worded The journeyman must verify that the apprentice has [fill in the unknown end of the sentence] during the analysis of the [technical description] circuit...
     
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