Chi è in sospetto è in difetto

Aryetti

Senior Member
Italiano/dialetto veneto :D
I can't find a translation or a proverb fitting the italian "chi è in sospetto è in difetto", which means that those who suspect of the others are the first ones who have something to hide. Can you help me?
(corrections appreciated)
 
  • rrose17

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    The accuser is the guilty one.
    The one who makes accusations has something to hide.

    I wouldn't say these are common proverbs, just translations.
     

    theartichoke

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    Also not a proverb, but you might say "suspicious people are to be suspected."

    I'm racking my brains for proverbs. It's sort of close to the pot calling the kettle black (x accusing y of something that x is even guiltier of), but is the person "chi è in sospetto" actually making accusations, or just being suspicious? It seems to me that there's a difference.

    (At the risk of being both irrelevant and gross, I'll add that the first saying that came to mind was "he who smelt it, dealt it":D--what kids say to each other when someone says "ew, what's that stink? Did you fart?")
     

    Aryetti

    Senior Member
    Italiano/dialetto veneto :D
    I like both "the accuser is the guilty one" and "suspicious people are to be suspected", thank you!

    As for the doubt theartichoke expressed, I'd say (in general meaning) the sospettoso doesn't necessarily accuse someone else (like in the example of the kids) and in the italian proverb I don't sense a hint of accusation.
    :)
     

    rrose17

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    Maybe it's just me but I was going to say that the only problem with "suspicious people" is that there are two meanings. One is people who don't trust others and the other is people who are themselves questionable, unsavoury. For example "There were some suspicious (looking) people hanging around in the alley."
     
    I am not sure who said it (The Rev Clarke?) but: . "Most of our suspicions of others are aroused by our knowledge of ourselves". "Suspicions recoil on those who harbour them" is one English version of this, but I don't know how to render that in Italian at this late hour.
     

    Tegs

    Mód ar líne
    English (Ireland)
    (At the risk of being both irrelevant and gross, I'll add that the first saying that came to mind was "he who smelt it, dealt it":D--what kids say to each other when someone says "ew, what's that stink? Did you fart?")
    This is the only one I'm aware of that is actually a common saying. It would help if we got a more context for the Italian. Who might be saying this? Children? Adults? Police officers?
     

    Aryetti

    Senior Member
    Italiano/dialetto veneto :D
    Maybe it's just me but I was going to say that the only problem with "suspicious people" is that there are two meanings. One is people who don't trust others and the other is people who are themselves questionable, unsavoury. For example "There were some suspicious (looking) people hanging around in the alley."
    I can see your point, in italian we have 2 terms to translate suspicious looking person (sospetto - ex. c'era un uomo sospetto che vagava per la strada) and person who suspects/doubts of the others (sospettoso - ex. il Commissario é sospettoso perchè la versione dell'indiziato non lo convince).
    The acception didn't lead me to misunderstandings this time :D
     
    Last edited:

    Aussieman

    New Member
    English - Australia
    I don't know if this expression is common enough to count as a proverb, but I can suggest, 'The fox smells his own scent'.
     
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