Chi più chi meno

esperide

New Member
Italian - Italy
Ciao, vorrei sapere la traduzione dell'espressione "chi più, chi meno".
Ad esempio, "hanno affrontato tutti questa situazione, chi più chi meno in modo devastante"
Grazie mille
Sara
 
  • giovannino

    Senior Member
    Italian, Neapolitan
    "Everybody dealt with this situation in a more or less devastating way"
    Let's ask native speakers but I think this has a different meaning from the original. I think it means that everybody dealt with the situation in the same (more or less devastating) way.
    What about translating "chi più chi meno" as "some more than others"?
     

    vincenzochiaravalle

    Senior Member
    Italy/Italian
    Giusto! :)

    Non mi è venuta in mente l'espressione "some more than others", che cattura esattamente il senso di "chi più chi meno". Tutte le espressioni a cui invece ho pensato mi sembravano ridondanti fino all'inverosimile. Per dirla tutta, ho l'impressione che anche stare a dire "some more than others" appesantisca ulteriormente una frase che diventa subito un po' "goffa": "dealt with... ...in a devastating way (??)".

    Non che mettere "more or less" là in mezzo fosse una gran soluzione! :eek:

    Mah.

    V.
     

    giovannino

    Senior Member
    Italian, Neapolitan
    Probably "chi più chi meno" can be translated differently in different contexts. Maybe in some cases "to varying degrees" might fit, but I guess it's a bit formal. What about:

    I politici sono tutti corrotti, chi più chi meno

    Maybe here one could say "politicians are all corrupt, one way or the other".

    Let's wait for more suggestions from native speakers.
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    Coping in a devasting way sounds strange to me. It sounds as though the way is devastating. In a devastated way would convey better what is meant here but even then it sounds wierd to my ears. People are devasted by what happens to them and how they cope with what happens to them is done badly/poorly etc.

    Is that the same with the Italian sentence?
     

    SoCalMezzo

    Senior Member
    English - American
    Probably "chi più chi meno" can be translated differently in different contexts. Maybe in some cases "to varying degrees" might fit, but I guess it's a bit formal. What about:

    I politici sono tutti corrotti, chi più chi meno

    Maybe here one could say "politicians are all corrupt, one way or the other".

    Let's wait for more suggestions from native speakers.
    In this sentence I would actually use "more or less". The phrase "more or less" is used a lot (an idiom)...probably very similar to chi più chi meno.
     

    vincenzochiaravalle

    Senior Member
    Italy/Italian
    Coping in a devasting way sounds strange to me. It sounds as though the way is devastating. In a devastated way would convey better what is meant here but even then it sounds wierd to my ears. People are devasted by what happens to them and how they cope with what happens to them is done badly/poorly etc.

    Is that the same with the Italian sentence?

    I'd say yes: the Italian sentence has the same problem. In a way, the "flaw" is in the original. "In maniera devastante" literally means that "the way" IS "devastating", where "devastante" is used -- perhaps somehow improperly -- in a sense of "horrific, terrible, shocking".
     

    theartichoke

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    New question

    I'm reopening this thread to ask if "chi più chi meno" always has the sense of "everyone" behind it. In the context I'm looking at, a young man who worked for the fascists in WWII, when he was still in his teens, is trying to come to terms with what he did, and concludes that people do stupid things when they're young. The lines I'm wondering about are as follows: Tutti quanti durante la guerra avevano fatto qualcosa per salvarsi la vita. Chi più chi meno aveva obbedito a degli ordini. Lui aveva scelto la strada più facile."

    Is he implying that everyone obeyed orders during the war, but some did so more than others? So, Everyone had done something, during the war, to save their own lives. Everyone had obeyed orders, some [just] more so than others. Or is the sense more like Everyone had done something, during the war, to save their own lives. Some had obeyed orders; others, less so. I.e., is it a continuation of the first sentence about "everyone," or is the suggestion that some people had saved their own lives by obeying orders (like he did), while others, perhaps, had saved their own lives by not obeying orders (by joining the resistance, etc.)?
     

    Tellure

    Senior Member
    Italian
    to some extent adv(to a certain degree)in parte, parzialmente avv
    più o meno, chi più chi meno
    You have to admit you're to blame to some extent. We all suffer to some extent when we're far away from our loved ones.
    Devi ammettere che la colpa è in parte anche tua.
    Quando siamo lontani dai nostri cari soffriamo tutti, chi più chi meno.
    some - Dizionario inglese-italiano WordReference


    or is the suggestion that some people had saved their own lives by obeying orders (like he did), while others, perhaps, had saved their own lives by not obeying orders (by joining the resistance, etc.)?
    L'espressione in se non suggerisce questo. Personalmente, sarei per escludere questa possibilità.
     
    Last edited:

    theartichoke

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    Thanks, Tellure and Pietruzzo. It seems a slightly odd thing to say, that everyone obeyed orders--presumably, some people got through the war without obeying orders--but since these are the character's own thoughts to make himself not feel so bad about his own past, the truth of the statement isn't the point.

    Could we say "some more eagerly, some less"?
    It sounds good in English, but I think "eagerly" is importing something that's not there in the original. Everyone had obeyed orders, at least to a certain extent, is probably the most straightforward way to go.
     

    Tellure

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Thanks, Tellure and Pietruzzo. It seems a slightly odd thing to say, that everyone obeyed orders--presumably, some people got through the war without obeying orders--but since these are the character's own thoughts to make himself not feel so bad about his own past, the truth of the statement isn't the point.
    Esatto, i fatti ci dicono che le cose non sono andate proprio così, ma evidentemente è un modo per il personaggio di sentirsi meno colpevole e fare pace con il suo passato.
    Per la traduzione, sicuramente altri sapranno confermare o consigliarti meglio.
     

    King Crimson

    Modus in fabula
    Italiano
    Everyone had obeyed orders, at least to a certain extent
    Not sure about that, art... this doesn't differentiate between individual decisions -- it seems that everyone obeyed orders the same (known, but not specified) way. The OT instead states that someone obeyed orders more (or less) than others, whatever their motivations.
     

    theartichoke

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    Not sure about that, art... this doesn't differentiate between individual decisions -- it seems that everyone obeyed orders the same (known, but not specified) way. The OT instead states that someone obeyed orders more (or less) than others, whatever their motivations.
    It took me some head-scratching, but I think I see what you mean--I meant the latter, but I see how what I wrote can be read as the former. Do you think it's clearer to write Everyone, to a certain extent, had obeyed orders? Or Everyone, to one extent or another, had obeyed orders? Or just go back to Everyone had obeyed orders, some just more than others?
     

    King Crimson

    Modus in fabula
    Italiano
    It took me some head-scratching, but I think I see what you mean--I meant the latter, but I see how what I wrote can be read as the former. Do you think it's clearer to write Everyone, to a certain extent, had obeyed orders? Or Everyone, to one extent or another, had obeyed orders? Or just go back to Everyone had obeyed orders, some just more than others?
    I'd go for the second or the third option (with the second one being almost a literal translation of the OT), the first one can be read both ways, in my opinion.
     

    lövastrell

    Member
    Italiano, Italia
    Hello everybody. May I point out that "chi più chi meno" is a very vague phrase, and multi-valued. On the face of it, it's about quantity. But it's not necessarily used only about quantity. It could mean that everyone obeyed orders in their own way, in varying contexts, with various degrees of commitment, some more reluctantly than others, someone did it overtly while keeping mental reservations, someone did it occasionally, someone regularly, etc. Such an Italian phrase, in a way, don't you think?
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top