Chichi wa watashi wo hitori de dekakesasete kuremasen deshita

Pacerier

Senior Member
English / Chinese
i have this sentence: Chichi wa watashi wo hitori de dekakesasete kuremasen deshita.

the translation my book gives me is this: "Dad did not let me go out on my own"

my question is that is it possible in any context for this sentence to mean "Dad (by himself, without deciding with mum) did not let me go out". i'm thinking it may be possible because hitori de may be refering to my dad rather than me.
 
  • Wishfull

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Hi.
    No.
    100 out of 100 native-Japanese people would think your second interpretation is impossible in this context.

    This sentence is like idioms. Very familiar expression.
     

    sneeka2

    Senior Member
    German
    I don't think it's possible to be understood this way. If you wanted to say "he decided by himself" you'd have to explicitly say it that way, haha ni kikazu ni / jibun de kimeta. In your sentence hitori de is pretty clearly the condition for dekakesasete kuremasen, it's not linked to chichi. Also, there's just talk of a single dad, you'd kind of expect him to decide on his own, unless it was made explicit that he usually doesn't do that, so hitori de would be redundant.

    If you do consider hitori de as referring to chichi, I think the meaning would become more like "Dad couldn't decide on his own to let me go out", implying he had to confer with other people before the decision could be made.
     
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