chicken butt/parson's nose

< Previous | Next >

boozer

Senior Member
Bulgarian
Hello again!

This time, friends, I'm trying to decide whether a restaurant menu should say "Chicken butts" or "Parson's noses". I just found the latter here in WR. Had never heard it before, but the dictionary says it's "informal".

I don't find chicken "butts" to be very formal either :) but I suppose this will be better understood by foreigners who only know some English and no Bulgarian at all. And, by all means, it will be surely understood by patrons who only know English. :)

I know another word too, but it is probably larger than the fatty cooked flesh I'm trying to describe.

What do you think?
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    The parson's nose is a humorous (and quite possibly obsolete) term for . . . well, I don't know what the proper name of the back end of a fowl is. The OED entry doesn't include a proper, polite term, it just says:
    the fatty extremity of the rump of a goose, fowl, etc., esp. when prepared for the table;
    which is not much help. Surely butchers must have a term? Would 'rump' do, perhaps? Chicken rump? To me, 'butts' is just obscure, and I'd be guessing what it meant.
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    'Rump', perhaps? Chicken rump? To me, 'butts' is just obscure, and I'd be guessing what it meant.
    This is what I wrote before I started thinking. :D

    But the definition of rump says "the lower back of a bird" and I don't want waiters beaten on my account :)

    Maybe I should just leave it the way it is - "rumps", huh?
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    How about "chicken tails", boozer?

    It's not a term I've heard (but then I use parson's nose, if I use anything...). However, there do seem to be a few relevant hits for "chicken tails" on google, and it's understandable - and avoids "butts":).
     

    Gwan

    Senior Member
    New Zealand, English
    How about "chicken tails", boozer?

    It's not a term I've heard (but then I use parson's nose, if I use anything...). However, there do seem to be a few relevant hits for "chicken tails" on google, and it's understandable - and avoids "butts":).
    I think this is probably a good suggestion. Definitely don't put "chicken butts"! I think "parson's nose" might cause confusion, especially for tourists who speak English but not as a first language (and no Bulgarian). It's not really an everyday word. Possibly "chicken tails" might be a bit confusing too, but people can probably figure out what it is.
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    However, there do seem to be a few relevant hits for "chicken tails" on google, and it's understandable - and avoids "butts":).
    If you take a solemn oath, Loob, that nobody's going to imagine having to also eat feathers, I embrace the idea. :D

    Sounds very good, I must admit.

    Thank you, all three of you.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    On this side, we call it a "part of the chicken that you throw away." ;) I've only heard it mentioned on cooking shows. Many people here wouldn't know what it is or believe that you would eat it.
    Pygostyle - Wikipedia
    Turkey tail or turkey butt has an international exportation market in places such as Micronesia, Samoa, and Ghana. The turkey tail is commonly exported from America because it is considered unhealthy and cut off of the normal turkey.[6] After World War II, cheap imported turkey tails became popular in Samoa. Because the cut has a very high fat content, it was banned from 2007 to 2013 to combat obesity, only allowed back when Samoa joined the World Trade Organization. The meat is otherwise used in pet food.
    Maybe you could trick us into ordering "chicken pygostyle" like PT Barnum's "This way to the egress." signs tricked people into leaving.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    As Loob says, it's the tail. It's the fatty protuberance in which the tail feathers are embedded, and it contains the last few bones of the spinal column - so it isn't a "butt".
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I've near heard of it, in any formulation. No matter what you pick, it wouldn't mean anything to me (until I saw this thread).
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top