Chicks dig it all the time

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namlan

Banned
Vietnam
- On your first date, you should take her to a coffee shop to talk or you two can go to a karaoke bar. Chicks dig it all the time.

- "dig" here means "notice", right?

Thanks a lot!

NamLan
 
  • RolandLavengro

    Member
    British English
    Wasn't "dig" 1960s American slang (colloquialism) for ... the meanings stated above? Like much of hippy slang it origninated in Black slang, a dictionary of which (edited by Calrence Major) notes "dig" as 1930s and after - to understand; a call for attention (like "Hey!") or an expression of understanding, like " I dig". I think the 1960s version was more "like" or "enjoy" - like "cool" and "I am into Kareoke" ... and "chick". Your sentence sounds a bit like a generalisation, but hey! who cares, dig the vibes man.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    "Chicks dig it" sounds really 1960s to me, too:D.

    NamLan, where did you find the phrase?
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Is this 1960s language now "cool" again or are we misleading Namlan? "Chicks dig it" is so dated that I'm tempted to dig out my mini-skirt and Go Go Boots...:eek:

    You should also be aware, Namlan, that even when this language was in use decades ago, many women and girls loathed the word "chicks".
     

    Monkey F B I

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Is this 1960s language now "cool" again or are we misleading Namlan? "Chicks dig it" is so dated that I'm tempted to dig out my mini-skirt and Go Go Boots...:eek:

    You should also be aware, Namlan, that even when this language was in use decades ago, many women and girls loathed the word "chicks".
    I wouldn't go so far as to say it's cool, but if I were to say it to one of my friends they'd understand and they wouldn't give me a hard time about it. If, however, an adult were to say it, most kids would have a good laugh :)

    Oh, I should clarify that I'm referring to the term "dig" in general. It's not limited to "chicks dig it"
     

    Davidvs91

    Senior Member
    English - American
    I wonder, is the term "chick" mainly an AE phrase, or is it prevalent in BE also? I assume it derived from the BE term "bird", or have I just been watching too much Philip Glenister?
     

    RolandLavengro

    Member
    British English
    I wonder, is the term "chick" mainly an AE phrase, or is it prevalent in BE also? I assume it derived from the BE term "bird", or have I just been watching too much Philip Glenister?
    "Chick" is also in the Black Slang Dictionary (ed. Clarence Major, 1970) and is defined as "A young woman, especially an attractive one", appropriated probably through the Beat Generation by hippies and mainstream whites (as with so much African American sub-culture - back-to-front baseball caps etc). But I digress, sorry. Chick is also used in terms such as "chick flick" (film about women), "gutta chick", "webcam chick" etc, meanings of which appear in online slang dictionaries, but some or all of which may indeed be offensive, perjorative and/or aspire to keep alive the legacy of the comparatively promiscuous 1960s era. The British have used it over the years, but usually trendy young people who readily adopt Americanisms. It was prevelant in the 1970s, appropriately updating England's "bird", though even then it was self-consciously transatlantic. The Irish seemed to get away with it more, perhaps because of closer cultural ties with New England. I don't hear it much in the UK now - but then I don't "hang out with the in-crowd" so much nowadays - and the Kareoke machine doesn't have Van Morrison's Chick - a - Boom.
     
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    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Chick was in use well before the 1970s or even the 1960s. Who can forget the close harmony of the Everly Brothers, Phil and Don, with their hit single Bird Dog?

    Hey, bird dog get away from my chick
    Hey, bird dog you better get away quick
    Bird dog you better find a chicken little of your own

    FADE He's a bird

    Bird Dog
    , Cadence records, catalogue # Cadence 1350
    1958
     

    liliput

    Senior Member
    U.K. English
    The term was heavily used in the 60s and 70s, but I don't think it's ever fallen completely out of usage. One of the great indie anthems from the "Madchester" music movement in the 1990s was the Mock Turtles' "Can you dig it?". Although it's not widely used it would certainly be understood.

    As for chicks, I think many people would consider it a disrespectful term if it was used seriously. These days it's mostly used in a joking way if it's used at all. "Chick flick" is indeed a common expression, although I would say it describes a film aimed at women (usually romantic comedies) rather than necessarily about women.
     
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