Chief sewer

Uzume

Member
Spanish
Buenos días:

Necesito ayuda para encontrar una traducción para el término "chief sewer". Lo he encontrado en una novela histórica ambientada en el reinado de Enrique VIII. La frase es la siguiente:
Buckingham, as the king's chief sewer, held the bowl for the king to wash his hands.

En un libro con registros sobre diferentes coronaciones a lo largo de la historia de Inglaterra, he encontrado la siguiente definición.

The Chief Sewer is the officer who arranges the dishes at the King's table.

Sin embargo, no consigo encontrar un término exacto en español (si es que existe). ¿Alguien tiene alguna idea?

Muchas gracias de antemano :)
 
  • Mr.Dent

    Senior Member
    English - all over the USA
    I think there is an error, a typo perhaps. It should probably read 'chief steward', that is el mayordomo.
     

    Bevj

    Allegra Moderata (Sp/Eng, Cat)
    English (U.K.)
    It is not a typo.
    Sewer | Medieval Era | Stronghold Nation

    Seen as early as the 12th Century, a Sewer was under The Chief Steward of a Royal Court of Noble House. Originally, The Sewer was responsible to making sure that food was properly served and placed on a Dining Table. It was also his function to make sure that proper seating was arraigned. This was to make sure no “enemies” sat next to one another. The Sewer was also responsible for “tasting” the food (to make sure it was properly prepared). The position would eventually evolve into being held by a Earl (who would work closely with Royalty) – during these functions.

    I have no idea what the Spanish term would be......
     

    rajulbat

    Senior Member
    English - United States (Houston)
    If we extrapolate from the etymology, which according to Oxford is as follows--
    aphetic < Anglo-Norman asseour, < Old French asseoir to cause to sit, seat < Latin assidēre , < ad- + sedēre to sit--
    then we should be looking at a translation of asentador.

    And the DLE does record an analogous meaning for asentar in Spanish--
    1. tr. sentar (‖ poner a alguien en una silla). U. m. c. prnl.
    2. tr. Colocar a alguien en determinado lugar o asiento, en señal de posesión de algún empleo o cargo. U. t. c. prnl.

    But I'm no expert in medieval royal court titles and have no idea if there ever was such a title as asentador in the context of Spanish royal parties.
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    aphetic < Anglo-Norman asseour, < Old French asseoir to cause to sit, seat < Latin assidēre , < ad- + sedēre to sit--

    And the word is apparently unrelated to the etymology of the modern word sewer:
    [Middle English, from Anglo-Norman sewere, from Vulgar Latin *exaquāria : Latin ex-, ex- + Latin aquāria, feminine of aquārius, pertaining to water

    But I'm no expert in medieval royal court titles and have no idea if there ever was such a title as asentador in the context of Spanish royal parties.

    I didn't even know there was such a title as sewer! Still learning English after all these years.
     
    Top