Children are requested not to deposit litter in the play-area.

  • Ging3r

    Member
    Galiza, galician
    Hello again!

    "Children are requested not to deposit litter in the play-area" could be:

    "Kids must not rubbish in the play area"

    I don't know, it is difficult for me, I don't know informal English language :S
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Hey kids! don't drop rubbish in the playground!
    Your original sentence is very adult. Small children reading it in a playground would turn to each other and say:
    What's 'requested' mean? What's 'deposit' mean? and very probably (in the UK at least) What's 'litter' mean?
     
    rubbish is a noun used for litter in the UK. As in I have to buy a new rubbish bin.

    However, UK kids nowadays WILL understand what litter is, as they are constantly being educated about recycling and the like, and litter is used in this more formal context a lot. A litterbug is quite common (somebody who litters, drops litter), there was a whole Balamory (pre-schooler TV show from BBC) episode devoted to a hunt for one!

    So, for your sentence:

    Don't be a litterbug!
    Bin it.
    Take your rubbish/litter home - if there are no bins about. (I have seen Take you litter home on buses for example)
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    As may be noted from the above, the word that should be used will vary greatly depending on the country where the statement is to be made. I would seriously doubt, for example, that any typical American school child would understand what "bin it" meant, since "bin" is not used in AE to refer to the items commonly called wastebaskets, litter baskets, or garbage cans.
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    :confused: You don't use the word litter in England ?
    Sorry, Pedro, I was being a bit ironic there, we do use it ~ see below

    rubbish is a noun used for litter in the UK. As in I have to buy a new rubbish bin.

    However, UK kids nowadays WILL understand what litter is, as they are constantly being educated about recycling and the like, and litter is used in this more formal context a lot. A litterbug is quite common (somebody who litters, drops litter), there was a whole Balamory (pre-schooler TV show from BBC) episode devoted to a hunt for one!

    Yep, you're right, Magda, I was being ironic and inaccurate. Small children these days do know what litter is, since education became green(er). It's older kids and young adults [bloody hell, ewie, can you not generalize a bit more?] who seem largely unaware of the concept of littering. [and maybe just a bit more middle-aged?!]
     

    Porteño

    Member Emeritus
    British English
    I suppose I'm what is considered a little past middle-aged, but I was always very much aware what litter was when I lived in the UK. Litter baskets were found in public places and signs admonished you not to drop litter. 'Litterbug' came along later as I recall.
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    I suppose I'm what is considered a little past middle-aged, but I was always very much aware what litter was when I lived in the UK. Litter baskets were found in public places and signs admonished you not to drop litter. 'Litterbug' came along later as I recall.
    Me too, Porteño, me too ~ I'm 43 and so (I believe) at the tail end of the 'generation' brought up to believe that littering was (erm) anti-social (perhaps that's the word.) Sadly ~ see previous post on subject of generalizing ~ there grew up between my generation and the current 'green' generation several generations of folk for whom, it seems, the concept of littering has no meaning. At the risk of going way off topic and getting deleted (always a possibility) I've seen with my own eyes people aged, say, 15-35, dropping litter within inches of a litter bin. And it's not that they're missing the bin ~ they just don't seem to know what the bin is for.
    End of rant.
     
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