... children study Spanish language <from since> 6 years

lemmingpolka

Member
English & Spanish
Could someone tell me why I should use 'from' with the sentence below:

Here, children study Spanish language since 6 years
 
  • tomandjerryfan

    Senior Member
    English (Canada)
    Could someone tell me why I should use 'from' with the sentence below:

    Here, children study Spanish language since 6 years
    I would actually use "from" instead of "since." but if you're talking about age, you'll need to specify that. I would word the sentence as follows:

    Here, children study Spanish language from the age of 6.
     

    liliput

    Senior Member
    U.K. English
    The meaning of this sentence is not clear but I suppose you mean "Here, children study Spanish from the age of 6".
    Since is used with the present perfect tense to indicate something that started in the past and is still in effect. For example "These children have been studying Spanish since they were 6 years old." In this sentence we are referring to specific children who began studying Spanish when they were six years old and are still studying Spanish now.
    Compare the following:
    "I was in Spain from January until March" (I left Spain in March)
    "I've been in Spain since January" (I'm still in Spain).
    I hope this helps you.
     

    lemmingpolka

    Member
    English & Spanish
    So is 'from' a preposition or part of the present perfect tense and how does it work grammatically in my sentence. I am very confused.:confused:
     

    lemmingpolka

    Member
    English & Spanish
    How is the preposition 'from' used in my sentence? I am sorry to be a nuisance but I am having difficulties understanding.:eek:
     

    lemmingpolka

    Member
    English & Spanish
    Could someone please help me to understand the difference between 'from' and 'since' as in my sentence above.

    I am embarrassed that I cannot understand.
     

    liliput

    Senior Member
    U.K. English
    You can only use "since" in the context of a present perfect sentence, i.e. to refer to an action that started at a specific time in the past and is still occurring in the present.
    "I've been learning English since I was 12 years old"
    "I've been learning English since 1998"
    "I've been learning English since 9 years ago"
    "I've been writing this message since 5 minutes ago"
    "I've been writing this message since 4 o'clock"
    Sometimes it's better to use "for" in this type of sentence.E.g.
    "I've been learning English for 12 years"
    "I've been writing this message for 5 minutes."

    Your sentence is in the simple present tense as it refers to something that happens all the time. In addition, you are not referring to a specific time, but a specific age at which children in general start to learn Spanish. So, you have to use "from".
    "Here, children learn Spanish from the age of 6"
    "From" is often used with "to", as in;
    "Here, children learn Spanish from the age of 6 to the age of 15"
    "From" would also be used in the past tense:
    "I attended a Spanish course from the 12th to the 13th of May."
    "I was in Germany from Monday to Saturday."
    Also in the future tense:
    "I will be there from May to June"
    "I'm going to be there from 2 o'clock onwards"

    In conclusion: Only use "since" in present perfect sentences, for everything else use "from".
    I hope this helps.
     

    AWordLover

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Hi lemmingpolka,

    I see by your profile that you are a native English speaker. I hope that you have understood liliput's clear explanation showing that in the present perfect tense you may use since, and that the action continues until the present.

    Consider the following additional examples:

    As a lifelong learner, I have been studying English since I was six years old.
    [This tells you that I started studying English when I was six, and never stopped, my studying has not ended and continues now, in the present.]

    As a student in the US, I studied English in grade school from age six to age 18. [Here the studying spanned several years but both started and ended in the past.]

    If you are still having trouble understanding the difference, please try to describe what is confusing you. That will improve the chances that someone can give an explanation that helps.

    Best regards,
    AWordLover
     

    Kevman

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Here, children study Spanish language since 6 years
    It is unclear to me, lemmingpolka, whether this sentence is intended to mean
    Here, children study the Spanish language from the age of 6.
    or
    Here, children study the Spanish language for 6 years.

    Some languages, such as German (and Spanish, I believe), use their word for "since" to convey the second meaning, and you can often identify native speakers of such languages when they make this mistake in English.
     

    lemmingpolka

    Member
    English & Spanish
    Liliput, AWordLover and Kevman, thank-you so much for your help. Special thanks to liliput who has spent a lot of time making things clear for me. I understand completely now :D
    You are all very kind and your help has been very much appreciated.
    Lem
     
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