children tend to <bully> (another word for bullying?)

Ssarah

Member
Persian
Hello everybody,

I'm looking for another word for "school bullying" which sounds less severe.

There is this class of 10 year old girls that sometimes kick each other or want others to listen to them. Bullying sounds too severe to me! What other words do you suggest?

<<ADDED: In a sentence like this: "children tend to bully and tease each other less than before.">>
 
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  • suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Odd! I would say that kicking is severe. I would not use a milder word than bullying for that. Maybe hassle or harrass might work if you think kicking is not bullying!
     

    Ssarah

    Member
    Persian
    Odd! I would say that kicking is severe. I would not use a milder word than bullying for that. Maybe hassle or harrass might work if you think kicking is not bullying!
    I'm writing an academic paper about these students so I want to be accurate in my description. They don't kick each other in a way that harms, it might just hurt a bit!!

    Can I say "moderate bullying" or something like that?
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    In the Wikipedia article, which has "multiple issues," on School bullying, there is this:

    In a survey by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), students in a school were asked to complete a questionnaire.

    "A total of 10.6 percent of the children replied that they had 'sometimes' bullied other children, a response category defined as 'moderate' bullying. An additional 8.8 percent said they had bullied others once a week or more, defined as 'frequent' bullying. Similarly, 8.5 percent said they had been targets of moderate bullying, and 8.4 percent said they were bullied frequently.


    Their "moderate bullying" seems to be related to frequency rather than severity. I don't know any more on the subject that what I read there.
     

    Ssarah

    Member
    Persian
    Their "moderate bullying" seems to be related to frequency rather than severity. I don't know any more on the subject that what I read there.
    wow! thanks Copyright!

    I searched "pester" and "harass", it seems that pester is more related to children's behavior towards teachers or parents (adults), and most of the times harass is related to sexual issues. to pick on sb, on the other hand, means "to criticize, punish, or be unkind to the same person often and unfairly."

    So is it correct to use this in the sentence: "children tend to pick on and tease each other less than before."
     
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    Ssarah

    Member
    Persian
    That seems all right. Whether it's "academic" enough, I don't know. I'll let you decide. :)

    My first language is not English. I have no idea how it might sound in an academic paper! But it definitely is less severe than "bully", so I have no other choice :cool: Let the professors smile a bit while reading my paper :D

    Thanks Copyright, you were so helpful :thumbsup:
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    "Pick on" is mostly used by children to describe how adults single them out, particularly teachers. You hear it less in terms of peer-group interactions and I never heard it used for something that involved physical contact.


    You would have no problem if you used bullying, of course. Your reason for not doing so looks weaker everytime you find fault with the alternatives!
     
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