Children who grow up in big cities often have trouble connecting to nature

Wubin

New Member
Chinese
I got this sentence from a video.
Children who grow up in big cities often have trouble connecting to nature.

I'm confused about "connecting to nature".

Children who grow up in big cites often have trouble when they connect to nature.

Is the second sentence correct? And how to explain the first sentence?
 
  • velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    The first sentence suggests that the children find it difficult to "connect" with nature, so in fact they don't really connect with it.

    The second sentence is grammatically correct; it means that they do connect with nature, but when they do that is a source of trouble for them.:confused:
     

    Wubin

    New Member
    Chinese
    The first sentence suggests that the children find it difficult to "connect" with nature, so in fact they don't really connect with it.

    The second sentence is grammatically correct; it means that they do connect with nature, but when they do that is a source of trouble for them.:confused:
    Thanks, and my biggest problem is in the first sentence. I have read some grammar books, and they all have the structure "SVO", for example:

    1. I have a pen.
    2. I was running.

    but in "Children who grow up in big cities often have trouble connecting to nature.", I don't know what is connecting to nature.

    I have heard a grammar tip called "existential there".

    1. There are some people waiting at the bus stop.
    2. Some people are waiting at the bus stop.

    I want to know if there is a connection between connecting to nature and waiting at the bus stop.

    Thanks.
     

    Wubin

    New Member
    Chinese
    Yes its good it means That they have problems to interact with nature. If you need that sentence for some language just tell me.
    Thanks, and my biggest problem is in the first sentence. I have read some grammar books, and they all have the structure "SVO", for example:

    1. I have a pen.
    2. I was running.

    but in "Children who grow up in big cities often have trouble connecting to nature.", I don't know what is connecting to nature.

    I have heard a grammar tip called "existential there".

    1. There are some people waiting at the bus stop.
    2. Some people are waiting at the bus stop.

    My questions are:
    1. Is there a connection between connecting to nature and waiting at the bus stop?
    2. Is this sentence "Children who grow up in big cities often have trouble interacting with nature." correct?

    Thanks.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    This is a common construction:

    I have trouble doing something.
    I spend time doing something.

    I regard it as an idiomatic construction; I'm not quite sure how it's analysed grammatically. I don't see a connection with There is someone waiting at the bus stop. "Waiting at the bus stop" is adjectival I think, modifying "someone".

    Edit: Children [...] have trouble connecting to nature.

    It isn't exactly "when they connect to nature". I would paraphrase it as "Children have trouble (trying to) connect to nature". They have trouble with this process.

    When I try to phone my bank I can't get through easily: I have trouble contacting my bank.
     
    Last edited:

    Wubin

    New Member
    Chinese
    This is a common construction:

    I have trouble doing something.
    I spend time doing something.

    I regard it as an idiomatic construction; I'm not quite sure how it's analysed grammatically. I don't see a connection with There is someone waiting at the bus stop. "Waiting at the bus stop" is adjectival I think, modifying "someone".

    Edit: Children [...] have trouble connecting to nature.

    It isn't exactly "when they connect to nature". I would paraphrase it as "Children have trouble (trying to) connect to nature". They have trouble with this process.

    When I try to phone my bank I can't get through easily: I have trouble contacting my bank.
    OK, thank you very much.
     
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