chin wag

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paulvial

Senior Member
bonjour

Comment traduire "chin wag " dans cette phrase ?

Do tell me when you are free for a bit of a chin wag !

j'ai pensé à deux possibilités :
conversation
commérage

Mais aucune ne semble bien refléter le sens ni le ton de la phrase en anglais

Toute aide appréciée
 
  • la grive solitaire

    Senior Member
    United States, English
    Chin wag est une expression idiomatique et familière qui veut dire une conversation. To have a chin wag: se parler un peu.
     
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    paulvial

    Senior Member
    Merci La grive solitaire
    je crois que conversation " ne marche pas bien dans cette phrase (pas naturel )
    en revanche je ne sais pas pourquoi je n'avais pas pensé à votre 2ième suggestion , qui me parait bien convenir
    Merci
     

    akaAJ

    Senior Member
    American English, Yiddish
    I agree on "bavardage", but "conversation" is acceptable. I should add that no one I know has ever, or would ever, say "chin wag". I associate the term with the henpecked dentist who shows up from time to time on the old (but good) Britcom "As Time Goes By" with Judie Dench and Geoffrey Palmer.
     

    The Prof

    Senior Member
    I agree on "bavardage", but "conversation" is acceptable. I should add that no one I know has ever, or would ever, say "chin wag". I associate the term with the henpecked dentist who shows up from time to time on the old (but good) Britcom "As Time Goes By" with Judie Dench and Geoffrey Palmer.
    It's still in use here in the UK, although probably not by the younger generation. I personally am not very likely to use it, but I have certainly heard 'having a chinwag' used on many occasions. :)
     

    paulvial

    Senior Member
    thank you everyone
    Actually I have heard (and used ) chin-wag many time whilst in England, and yes I am no spring chicken ....mais je ne suis pas près de manger les pissenlits par la racine non plus ......
    Je ne connaissais pas "discuter le bout de gras " .et ça me fait bien sourire ...

    Merci à tous
     
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    steviesouris

    Senior Member
    UK = chin wag
    US = shoot the breeze/chew the fat
    But they're all expressions losing currency amongst the youngsters. I associate "having a bit of a chin wag" with a woman of a certain age in a house dress.
    I think "bavardage" is the best choice.
     

    The Prof

    Senior Member
    UK = chin wag
    US = shoot the breeze/chew the fat
    But they're all expressions losing currency amongst the youngsters. I associate "having a bit of a chin wag" with a woman of a certain age in a house dress.
    I think "bavardage" is the best choice.
    That's strange - I associate a 'chin wag' with men, whereas women are more likely to have a good old 'chat' or even (heaven forbid!), a 'gossip'! :D
     

    The Prof

    Senior Member
    I'd tend to agree.... not sure why! What about a 'natter?'!
    Yes, there's nothing wrong with a 'natter'. :)
    A natter, a chin wag, a chat - to me, those three are very similar in meaning.

    'Gossip', however, has a more negative nuance to me, implying that other people's lives are being discussed.

    As regards a French translation of these terms, I was wondering if there is a similar difference in nuance between 'bavardages' and 'commérages'?
     

    paulvial

    Senior Member
    Yes, there's nothing wrong with a 'natter'. :)
    A natter, a chin wag, a chat - to me, those three are very similar in meaning.

    'Gossip', however, has a more negative nuance to me, implying that other people's lives are being discussed.

    As regards a French translation of these terms, I was wondering if there is a similar difference in nuance between 'bavardages' and 'commérages'?
    "commérages" has definitely a pejorative connotation similar to "gossip"
    a chin wag is more of a friendly chat ....which of course, when women are involved, can easily turn into a gossip .....autrement dit, un bavardage qui se transforme assez facilement (entre femmes) en commérage.. en français "commérages " est plus facilement associé avec les femmes ..allez savoir pourquoi !
     
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