China's electric car boom

Celiosss

New Member
Portuguese
China's electric car boom. <-----Phrase from thread title added to post by moderator (Florentia52)----->

Hello, guys. Just wanna double check here. Which word do you label as the "Thing" in a Noun Group analysis? I'm between car and boom. any thoughts? Thanks in advance.
 
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  • Celiosss

    New Member
    Portuguese
    "Boom" sounds right to me, Celiosss. All the other words are used to modify that noun.
    Thank you, very much, sir. but
    What about the role of the word "car" within this sentence... Can it be considered a simple Epithet? Because "electric" it's clearly a classifier.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    You're welcome. To me, "electric car" works as an adjective to tell us something more about the basic noun "boom". So does "China's". Although I wouldn't call "China's" an ordinary adjective (perhaps people do call it a "possessive adjective", perhaps they call it something else), it does modify the meaning of "boom".

    I can't keep up with all the different labels that students of English as a second language pick up in their grammar classes all around the world. If you want to talk about the label "classifier" and what that means, I'll let you do that with somebody else, okay?
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I think "boom" is the head of the noun phrase, or "the Thing", as you put it.

    It's a car boom ( the noun "car" is adjectival here), but more specifically it's an electric car boom - and more specifically still it's China's electric car boom.
     

    Celiosss

    New Member
    Portuguese
    To me, "electric car" works as an adjective to tell us something more about the basic noun "boom". So does "China's". Although I wouldn't call "China's" an ordinary adjective (perhaps people do call it a "possessive adjective", perhaps they call it something else), it does modify the meaning of "boom".

    I can't keep up with all the different labels that students of English as a second language pick up in their grammar classes all around the world. If you want to talk about the label "classifier" and what that means, I'll let you do that with somebody else, okay?
    Ok, sir. I really appreciate that.
    I think "boom" is the head of the noun phrase, or "the Thing", as you put it.

    It's a car boom ( the noun "car" is adjectival here), but more specifically it's an electric car boom - and more specifically still it's China's electric car boom.
    Thank you. You know, sometimes the more we pay attention to it the more it gets confusing.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    What exactly do you find confusing, Celioss?

    China's electric car - "car" is a noun.
    China's electric car boom - "Boom" cannot be a verb here, so it must be the noun. A "car boom" is a boom in the number of cars. Compare with "baby boom" and "business boom", where "baby" and "business" are both nouns that function in those phrases as epithets.) See Loob's answer below.

     
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    Celiosss

    New Member
    Portuguese
    What exactly do you find confusing, Celioss?

    China's electric car - "car" is a noun.
    China's electric car boom - "Boom" cannot be a verb here, so it must be the noun. A "car boom" is a boom in the number of cars. Compare with "baby boom" and "business boom", where "baby" and "business" are both nouns that function in those phrases as epithets.
    I agree 100% with that. The confusing part here is when we have to precisely define those two adjectives "electric and car" within this sentence. Between Epiphet and Classifier.
     

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    Celiosss

    New Member
    Portuguese
    You're welcome. To me, "electric car" works as an adjective to tell us something more about the basic noun "boom". So does "China's". Although I wouldn't call "China's" an ordinary adjective (perhaps people do call it a "possessive adjective", perhaps they call it something else), it does modify the meaning of "boom".

    I can't keep up with all the different labels that students of English as a second language pick up in their grammar classes all around the world. If you want to talk about the label "classifier" and what that means, I'll let you do that with somebody else, okay?
    How would you define those two adjectives "electric and car" in the referred sentence? Between Epiphet and Classifier, according to this slide below.
     

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    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    It's a long time since I read anything on Systemic Functional Linguistics, but as I recall a key test for distinguishing between Epithets and Classifiers was that Classifiers could not be used with "very" or "more". So in "an intelligent teacher", intelligent would be an Epithet because you can say "a very intelligent teacher"; in "a geography teacher", geography would be a Classifier because you can't say "a very geography teacher".
    On that basis, the pre-modifiers in your example would be Classifiers, not Epithets.
     
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    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    The confusing part here is when we have to precisely define those two adjectives "electric and car" within this sentence. Between Epiphet and Classifier.
    Aha! It would have been very helpful if you'd told us that in the beginning. I thought you were simply using the term "epithet" as a synonym for "adjective".
     

    Celiosss

    New Member
    Portuguese
    What exactly do you find confusing, Celioss?

    China's electric car - "car" is a noun.
    China's electric car boom - "Boom" cannot be a verb here, so it must be the noun. A "car boom" is a boom in the number of cars. Compare with "baby boom" and "business boom", where "baby" and "business" are both nouns that function in those phrases as epithets.) See Loob's answer below.
    Thank you very much.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Loob has read something on Systemic Functional Linguistics, but she's one of very few members in this forum who has done so.;) I wouldn't be surprised to learn that she is the only member who has done so.

    If you want to use terms from a particular way of looking at grammar, it would be a good idea for you to warn the rest of us at the beginning of your thread, Celiosss. That keeps people like me from even attempting to provide you with an answer you're not looking for. It's a good way to keep both of us from wasting our time, don't you think?
     
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