Chips of bag vs Bag of chips

Growlyp

Banned
American English
What was the differenced?

Gave the reasoned for these instead of just answered it.

I was confused about the meaning because both of these still made sense.

The meaning for me is: connecting two concepts together

Is it corrected or incorrected
 
  • JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Shorter words are often the most difficult to learn for non-native speakers, while native speakers learn them by experience as they are growing up. One meaning of "of" is below and it is the one that is relevant to your question. So "a bag of chips" is "a bag containing chips". The other version would mean "some chips containing a bag" or "some chips made up of a bag - which is obviously incorrect.
    1. containing; made up of:a dress of silk.
    (I wonder why you are using the past tense for your verbs?)
     

    Growlyp

    Banned
    American English
    Shorter words are often the most difficult to learn for non-native speakers, while native speakers learn them by experience as they are growing up. One meaning of "of" is below and it is the one that is relevant to your question. So "a bag of chips" is "a bag containing chips". The other version would mean "some chips containing a bag" or "some chips made up of a bag - which is obviously incorrect.

    (I wonder why you are using the past tense for your verbs?)

    writing in present tense was illogical. Every word I wrote was in past tense. According to what you said and I was following what grammar books said.

    "The other version would mean "some chips containing a bag" or "some chips made up of a bag - which is obviously incorrect."

    Why was it incorrected? Who'w the authority for telling you that you'wr incorrected?

    Why was my definition incorrected?


    I've been learning English since elementary, but the definitions are vague and arbitrary and the U.S school systems need a reformation.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    writing in present tense was illogical. Every word I wrote was in past tense. According to what you said and I was following what grammar books said.
    What was the differenced? What is the difference? The difference still exists in the present. Also, "difference" is a noun. Nouns don't have tense, yet you've given it one. "Reason" is also a noun. "Correct" and "incorrect" are adjectives and also have no past tense.
     

    Growlyp

    Banned
    American English
    What was the differenced? What is the difference? The difference still exists in the present. Also, "difference" is a noun. Nouns don't have tense, yet you've given it one. "Reason" is also a noun. "Correct" and "incorrect" are adjectives and also have no past tense.
    Ok? It'w still functioning as one.. and there was a word called differenced...
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Growlyp, What is your native language?
    "Chips of bag vs Bag of chips" What was the difference?
    Chips of bag is wrong grammatically because "bag" is a singular countable noun, and all singular countable nouns must be qualified by a determiner (like "a" or "the" or "his)

    Chips of a bag is correct grammatically but it cannot be understood - it is meaningless.

    "Bag of chips" is wrong grammatically because "bag" is a singular countable noun, and all singular countable nouns must be qualified by a determiner (like "a" or "the" or "his", etc.) Chips is not a singular countable noun - it is plural - it does not need a determiner (although sometimes, it may have one.)

    "A bag of chips" is correct grammatically and it is perfectly understandable - it means "A bag that contains chips."

    Of is a preposition. Of has many meanings: this is one of them.
     

    Growlyp

    Banned
    American English
    Growlyp, What is your native language?

    Chips of bag is wrong grammatically because "bag" is a singular countable noun, and all singular countable nouns must be qualified by a determiner (like "a" or "the" or "his)

    Chips of a bag is correct grammatically but it cannot be understood - it is meaningless.

    "Bag of chips" is wrong grammatically because "bag" is a singular countable noun, and all singular countable nouns must be qualified by a determiner (like "a" or "the" or "his", etc.) Chips is not a singular countable noun - it is plural - it does not need a determiner (although sometimes, it may have one.)

    "A bag of chips" is correct grammatically and it is perfectly understandable - it means "A bag that contains chips."

    Of is a preposition. Of has many meanings: this is one of them.

    My native language was Spanish but now it'w English due to rough times. And no longer can speak Spanish.

    "Chips of a bag is correct grammatically but it cannot be understood - it is meaningless."
    Why? You'wr basically connecting two concepts together, No?

    "A bag of chips" is correct grammatically and it is perfectly understandable - it means "A bag that contains chips."
    I left out the A because it'w a distraction.


    Implication of your First rule: Of cannot be preceded by an uncountable noun.
    I'll follow this rule, then.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    My native language was Spanish but now it'w English due to rough times. And no longer can speak Spanish.

    "Chips of a bag is correct grammatically but it cannot be understood - it is meaningless."
    Why? You'wr basically connecting two concepts together, No?
    (I think your keyboard is putting in the letter w when it should be putting in other letters - it'w :cross: You'wr:cross:)
    There are different ways of connecting two concepts and it matters which way round you put them on either side of "of". And you can't just leave out words because you think they are a distraction :eek:
     

    Growlyp

    Banned
    American English
    (I think your keyboard is putting in the letter w when it should be putting in other letters - it'w :cross: You'wr:cross:)
    There are different ways of connecting two concepts and it matters which way round you put them on either side of "of". And you can't just leave out words because you think they are a distraction :eek:
    (I think your keyboard is putting in the letter w when it should be putting in other letters - it'w :cross: You'wr:cross:)
    xD

    That's what the grammar books says, not me.

    It's logical to use the past tense.

    Past tense is used for facts and things that happen in the past.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Past tense is used for facts and things that happen in the past.
    The difference between the meanings of two phrases is not something that happened in the past. The present tense is used for facts that are true now.
    Language is not about logic. You don't get to apply your personal opinions.
     

    Growlyp

    Banned
    American English
    The difference between the meanings of two phrases is not something that happened in the past. The present tense is used for facts that are true now.
    Language is not about logic. You don't get to apply your personal opinions.

    "You don't get to apply your personal opinions." Say that to the book.
     

    GregorioH

    Member
    English - US
    That's what the grammar books says, not me.

    You shouldn't argue with native speakers, particularly when they're trying to help you.

    A "bag of chips" would be a container that holds the kind of chips you can eat. Like Fritos.

    To make sense of "chips of bag," we need to create a special situation. Let's say we work for Frito-Lay testing the quality of bags of chips. We put numbers on the bags to make it clear which ones we tested. Then I could see one of us saying, "There are no problems with the chips of bag #3, but bag #2 was really bad."

    But under normal circumstances, I would say, "the chips from the bag are good, but the ones on the table are stale."
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Just so you know what we are talking about:

    'A bag of chips' in American English:
    81nM3GJpj7L._SL1500_.jpg


    'A bag of chips' in British English:
    _50405862_jex_899106_de27-1.jpg


    Neither of them is a 'chips of bag.' This is meaningless.
     

    ain'ttranslationfun?

    Senior Member
    US English
    Just by the way, 'a [small/medium/large/giant/jumbo] (we need the quantifier) bag of chips" refers to the amount contained in the bag: "John ate a whole giant bag of chips for lunch! No wonder he's been putting on weight!" (He didn't eat the bag.)
     

    Growlyp

    Banned
    American English
    You shouldn't argue with native speakers, particularly when they're trying to help you.

    A "bag of chips" would be a container that holds the kind of chips you can eat. Like Fritos.

    To make sense of "chips of bag," we need to create a special situation. Let's say we work for Frito-Lay testing the quality of bags of chips. We put numbers on the bags to make it clear which ones we tested. Then I could see one of us saying, "There are no problems with the chips of bag #3, but bag #2 was really bad."

    But under normal circumstances, I would say, "the chips from the bag are good, but the ones on the table are stale."

    I guess "of" is the hardest word to learn in English. It always confuses me, because I don't know which word should go before or after of.

    I've known that it's bag of chips, but I thought my definition would be accurate.
    I guess not.

    "Chips of from a bag" could be said as "bag chips".

    Growlyp, I think you need to buy a better grammar book.
    Nope, most of it is completely arbitrary and changing.
    :thumbsup:
    Or, failing that, tell us which one you are using and quote these "rules" from the book.:)
    I've been reading Wren and Martin and they said nothing about what I said.

    No grammar books that I've read said nothing about specific words like: "of", "by", "for" "in" "of"

    I've searched these words up throughout my journey of mastering English, But most of them are just arbitrary. And my compacity to memorize things is just not my thing. xD

    I just wanted to make sure if my definition was accurate, But it wasn't from what I can tell. xD
     

    Growlyp

    Banned
    American English
    Yes, but it must be done in the correct order. For example: "
    Take the meat from the freezer, eat it, now cook the meat."Really? How did you work that out?

    "Take the meat from the freezer, eat it, now cook the meat." How is that in order? eat it, then cook the meat?

    "Really? How did you work that out?" A bread of A water of

    "Bag of chips" is wrong grammatically because "bag" is a singular countable noun, and all singular countable nouns must be qualified by a determiner (like "a" or "the" or "his", etc.) Chips is not a singular countable noun - it is plural - it does not need a determiner (although sometimes, it may have one.)

    Can't use articles A or An for uncountable nouns, so can't connect these concepts because it's not countable
     

    bwac14

    Senior Member
    English - US
    "Bag of chips" is wrong grammatically because "bag" is a singular countable noun, and all singular countable nouns must be qualified by a determiner (like "a" or "the" or "his", etc.)
    You’re correct. Without the determiner, it’s wrong:

    I bought bag of chips. :cross:

    I bought a bag of chips. :tick:
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    US English
    I guess "of" is the hardest word to learn in English. It always confuses me, because I don't know which word should go before or after of.
    Many languages have a word like "of", and use it for the same meaning.
    My native language was Spanish but now it's English.
    Spanish uses "de" in many of the same ways English uses "of".

    In this use of "of", English makes an uncountable substance (dirt, rice, soup, chips) into a countable counter filled with that substance by using "of":

    - a bowl of soup
    - a plate of beans
    - a dish of rice
    - a bag of chips
    - a glass of water

    You can't reverse that -- the pattern is [<container> of <substance>]

    Spanish has the same pattern.
     
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    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Can't use articles A or An for uncountable nouns, so can't connect these concepts because it's not countable
    Bag is not uncountable; it is countable. Simply omitting the "a" does not make a noun uncountable.
     
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