cholera <was brought> to Europe from Asia

GandalfMB

Senior Member
Bulgarian - Yellow Beach
Hello,
these are two self-made sentences and I would be happy if you told me if they were correct. "In the 18th century Cholera was brought to Europe from Asia" and "In the 18th century Cholera was spread from Asia to Europe". The second sentence is not mine and I think it is wrong. Can people actually spread a disease from one place to another?


Thank you in advance and feel free to get mad at me, please. I really don't mind.
 
  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Yes, people can spread disease from one place to another. It is probably the commonest cause of the transmission of disease: "Stay at home and do not come to the office if you have a cold, you will spread it to everyone!"

    The famous case of Typhoid Mary is an example of how a person spread a disease over an area.

    However, I cannot quite understand that (i) if there are two sentences and (ii) both are self-made, how the second one cannot be yours... :confused:
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    By the way, Paul, does that mean that the first sentence is wrong? Is "bring" not used correctly?

    Thank you
    No. As RMS says, both are fine. It is simply that bring and spread have different meanings. When you bring something, the action stops when it arrives. When you spread something, the action takes place in a given area and over a certain amount of time.
     

    Smauler

    Senior Member
    British English
    I'd use "In the 18th century Cholera spread from Asia to Europe".

    I'd expect a "by" at the end of this sentence : "In the 18th century Cholera was spread from Asia to Europe". Cholera is being spread by something or someone, and the sentence does not say what.
     

    GandalfMB

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian - Yellow Beach
    I'd use "In the 18th century Cholera spread from Asia to Europe".

    I'd expect a "by" at the end of this sentence : "In the 18th century Cholera was spread from Asia to Europe". Cholera is being spread by something or someone, and the sentence does not say what.
    What you say is most definitely an option, but does that mean that the sentence sounds odd? The dictionary says that the verb can be used both, transitively and intransitively. I really can't see what the problem is...
     
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