chopine / pinte (recette)

bezani

Senior Member
English - Canada
Hello,
I am translating a recipe book for a company. The employees have each submitted recipes.
Part of the instructions to the employees is to use a standardised set of abbreviations, which includes:

"chopine= chop, pinte = pte"

Hmm. I used to think a chopine was a pint...?

Thank you.
 
  • CarlosRapido

    Senior Member
    français - English (Can)
    pinte (Anglais; quart) = au Canada, ancienne mesure de capacité pour les liquides, valant un quart de gallon (1,136 l)

    chopine = si c'est une recette avec des mesures impériales la chopine est de 20oz donc 750ml, la chopine de 16oz, 2 tasses (500ml) est pour les mesures américaines

    Etant donné que la question est issue du Canada, c'est ce tableau qui s' applique;

    1 imperial quart
    (pinte - Canada)
    =1/4imperial gallons
    =2imperial pints (2 chopines)
    =40imperial fluid ounces
    1.1365225litres
    69.355cubic inches
    38.430US fluid ounces

    Donc 1 pinte (quart) = 2 chopines (pints) - 1 chopine = 1 pint ...et le demiard = 1/2 chopine
     
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    dasubergeek

    Senior Member
    English - US; French - CH
    Bonjour,

    Also, in Canada, berries are sold in chopines, never in pintes. Why they're not sold by the gram like everything else is beyond me, but there you are. The closest (but really archaic in AE) term for a "chopine" of berries would be "punnet".
     

    bezani

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    Yes, UberGeek, It's because of the berries that I thought maybe chopine was for solids and pintes for liquids. But then I remembered wine...

    So, Carlos are you saying that a chopine equals a half-pint?
    (Donc 1 pinte (quart) = 2 chopines (pints) - 1 chopine = 1 pint)
     

    CarlosRapido

    Senior Member
    français - English (Can)
    So, Carlos are you saying that a chopine equals a half-pint?
    Not a half-pint, a half-quart...

    The confusion comes from the fact that pinte in Canada is not a pint, but a quart. 1 Chopine = 1/2 quart = 1 pint

    1 gallon/160oz = 4 pintes/40oz (quarts) = 8 chopines/20oz (pints) = 16 demiards/10oz

    1 chopine = 1/2 pinte.
     
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    bezani

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    Woah. This is really confusing...
    When I buy a "pinte" of beer in Canada, I (unfortunately) do not get 1.1365225 litres!

    Just to throw a little more info into the melee:
    The label on my blueberry container (which comes from the U.S.) says "1 U.S. dry pint 551 ml -- 1 Chopine Américaine sèche 551 ml"

    This Wikipedia page says that
    The imperial pint (≈ 568 mL) is used in the United Kingdom and Ireland and to some extent in other Commonwealth nations. In the United States, two pints are used: a liquid pint (≈ 473 mL) and a less-common dry pint (≈ 551 mL).

    Then, this one states that
    "La pinte impériale, symbole pt (Imp), est une des unités de mesure anglo-saxonnes, qui vaut 20 onces liquides impériales, soit exactement 0,568 261 25 litre ; une pinte US, symbole pt (US fl), est une unité américaine pour mesurer le volume des liquides, qui vaut 16 onces liquides US, soit exactement 0,473 176 473 litre. C'est le volume, par exemple, des canettes de RedBull. Une pinte US, symbole pt (US dry), est une unité américaine pour mesurer le volume des matières sèches. Elle vaut exactement 0,550 610 471 357 5 litre. Au Canada, les pintes impériales et américaines sont appelées « chopines », car une pinte impériale est exactement la moitié de la pinte canadienne, la pinte US cinq douzièmes."
    Termium says a "chopine" is a "pint" and a "pinte" is a "quart".

    On the whole, I think we can all agree that this imperial system of using the king's toe as a unit of measurement has seen its day? And that Canada is one of the most confusing countries in the world as regards the way we measure things in a big old jumble of systems...

    Thank you both for your help!
     
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