chorus / choral / choir score

ueken

New Member
English
Can these three terms be used interchangeably?
Is there a difference in meaning? (e.g. with or without accompanyment or solo parts)
 
  • Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    "choral" is an adjective so it is not interchangeable with the other two which are nouns. Perhaps you meant "chorale"?
    In any case, it's going to depend on context. Even though they are can be synonyms, they have specific meanings as well.
     

    ueken

    New Member
    English
    I can't see why the parts of speech (adjective, noun) should make any difference in terms of meaning and language use. Choral parts and chorus parts have the same meaning despite different grammar categories.

    "chorale" is something different.

    I am fully aware that similar terms can be synonyms or have specific meanings depending on context. That's the whole point of my query here. So, what ARE those specific meanings? The general context is always the same: sophisticated orchestral sections that make it practical to publish the choral parts separately.
     

    dwipper

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    They're pretty much interchangeable. In my experience, choir is more common than chorus, but both are used. When acting as a modifier, choral may sound slightly more sophisticated/educated than choir, but their meaning is the same.
     

    OzziBoy

    Senior Member
    English - Australian
    Myridon and dwipper are correct. In current times, most of those words are used interchangeably. But there are some differences ...

    Choir, chorale and chorus are nouns.
    - I sang in the choir / chorale / chorus.
    - I sung with the choir / choral / chorus.
    - The chorale sounded beautiful.

    Choral is an adjective. Short for the German "Choralgesang" meaning "chorale song."
    - I was reading the choral score.
    - It was a beautiful choral piece we heard.

    Here are the subtleties ...

    Choir and chorale are used to describe a group of singers who sing religious music. They are often used when presenting orchestra music.

    Chorus is used for a group of singers who sing secular music. You'll find it it often used in modern theatre where the subject matter tends to be secular.

    Whether they are accompanied or not doesn't change the meaning of the word or the word used.

    Cheers,
    Ozzi
     

    ueken

    New Member
    English
    Thank you for your explanations, which somehow continue the existing choir vs. chorus threads here.

    I am specifically referring to a kind of sheet music called "score" and I'm inviting musical insiders to comment on this.
     

    dwipper

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    Well, I'm a music composer, and I have sung in many choirs and written several choral works myself, so I feel fairly qualified to answer.

    I would refer you to the second half of my previous comment. Both choral score and choir score are common. The first one tends to sound a little more sophisticated/educated than the second one, but I hear and use both frequently. I have never heard chorus score.
     

    OzziBoy

    Senior Member
    English - Australian
    Welcome to the composing club dwipper (I used to be in that area myself many years ago).

    dwipper is correct here. Choral score is a little more sophisticated than choir score. I have heard of a chorus score but again only in the theatre/musicals.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I can't see why the parts of speech (adjective, noun) should make any difference in terms of meaning and language use.
    I read the subject as "chorus", "choral", "choir score" while others read it as "chorus score", "choral score", "choir score" thus the misunderstanding. I seem to be in the minority. Sorry.
     

    ueken

    New Member
    English
    @Myridon: I see. Maybe I should have been more explicit, mentioning "score" with each form.

    @OzziBoy, dwipper: Thanks for your comments. As you didn't mention it, I take it that there is no difference in meaning with regard to accompanyment or solo parts. A choral score would precisely look like a choire score, then.
     
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