chuletón

Perdido

Senior Member
EEUU
El fin de semana pasado, mi mujer y yo compartimos un chuletón, una pieza de carne enorme y sabroso. ¿Cómo se traduce "chuletón"? Tenderloin?

Gracias y saludos.
 
  • Deloris

    Banned
    English USA
    No sé traducir "chuletón", pero te aseguro que no es un "T-bone steak" . . .
    ¿De veras? :rolleyes:

    “The huge chuletón (T-bone steak), seared over charcoal and sprinkled with sea salt” (Asador Fronton, Madrid).
    http://www.fodors.com/miniguides/mg...=madrid@95&cur_section=din&property_id=174675

    “However in all the Northern regions you will find delicious roasted baby lamb and kid, an excellent “chuleton” (“T” bone steak), “chuletillas” (baby lamb chops)” (Casas Cantabricas).
    http://www.casas.co.uk/metapage.php?id=1

    “Enjoy ajoarriero (cod in oil and red peppers), a chuletón (T-bone steak) and a variety of roast meats” (The kingdom of fine cuisine, Navarre).
    http://www.turismo.navarra.es/eng/porque-navarra/razones/reyno+buena+mesa.htm

    “The house specialty is the T-bone steak, a chuletón” (Maribel’s Guide to the País Vasco).
    maribelsguides.com/mg_pais_vasco.pdf

    chuletón large steak, T-bone steak
    Collins Spanish Dictionary

    chuletón m T-bone steak
    Oxford Dictionary
     

    Filis Cañí

    Banned
    Triana, caló
    I was going to say T-bone steak, too, but refrained because chuletones weigh in at over 2 pounds each (1-inch thick); and I've never seen a T-bone steak that big.
     

    Dani California

    Senior Member
    Spain, Spanish
    No sé traducir "chuletón", pero te aseguro que no es un "T-bone steak", porque lo he comido en España y no se parece nada al T-bone.

    Saludos.

    Hola Zumac! Quizás sí que te comiste un chuletón (pero desprovisto del hueso, hay restaurantes en que se lo quitan/quitaban por la normativa comunitaria que considera el espinazo de la vaca como material de riesgo), en todo caso yo tengo entendido que: chuletón=T-Bone steak; Entrecot=Tenderloin y solomillo=Sirloin steak.
    Saludos
     

    Filis Cañí

    Banned
    Triana, caló
    El diccionario puede decir misa, doña Daniela. Yo he comido tanto solomillo como tenderloin y entiendo por qué es el corte más caro: porque es el más tierno. Se puede cortar con un cuchillo de mantequilla. Mientras que si te ponen un entrecot o un sirloin steak delante, más vale que te pongan también un cuchillo bien afilado. El solomillo/tenderloin es un músculo alargado y finito, mientras que el entrecot/sirloin sale del costillar.

    Del solomillo/tenderloin se saca el filet mignon; sirva usted un filet mignon de sirloin steak y a ver lo que le dicen.
     

    Filis Cañí

    Banned
    Triana, caló
    Como si me trae una bula papal diciéndome que las naranjas se llaman apples. La vista y el paladar no engañan.

    No todos los hispanohablantes llaman al tenderloin de ternera solomillo (tampoco lo llamarán entrecot), pero que me lo discuta una madrileña es de juzgado de guardia.
     

    Dani California

    Senior Member
    Spain, Spanish
    :D Relájate y disfruta Filis y sobre todo.... admite otras opiniones.
    Y no las mias, sino las de los diccionarios: Langenscheidt, Collins, wordreference...
    Have a nice day:)
     

    Filis Cañí

    Banned
    Triana, caló
    Que las naranjas no son apples no es cuestión de opiniones, doña Daniela. Y para sacarnos de dudas, ahí está el filet mignon: ¿Tiene usted alguna duda de que el filet mignon sale de lo que en Madrid se conoce como solomillo de ternera? Hey guys, how do you call the cut of meat from which you get filet mignon?

    ¡No hay nada que me ponga más a parir que el que me confundan los filetes!
     

    sunce

    Senior Member
    Español, España

    Bil

    Banned
    English USA
    Gee, duh, I guess that’s why they call it a “chuletón”— a whole cut of T-bone that hasn’t been carved into chuletas.

    So far, whole teams of lexicographers from major publishing houses have already been cited who define the word "chuletón" as "T-bone." And a search on the Net with the keywords "chuletón" and "T-bone steak" turns up at least 100 restaurant owners in Spain who are translating the "chuletón" on their own menus as "T-bone steak."

    ¡Por el amor de Dios! ¿Qué más puedes pedir?
     

    zumac

    Senior Member
    USA: English & Spanish
    ¿De veras? :rolleyes:

    “The huge chuletón (T-bone steak), seared over charcoal and sprinkled with sea salt” (Asador Fronton, Madrid).
    http://www.fodors.com/miniguides/mg...=madrid@95&cur_section=din&property_id=174675

    “However in all the Northern regions you will find delicious roasted baby lamb and kid, an excellent “chuleton” (“T” bone steak), “chuletillas” (baby lamb chops)” (Casas Cantabricas).
    http://www.casas.co.uk/metapage.php?id=1

    “Enjoy ajoarriero (cod in oil and red peppers), a chuletón (T-bone steak) and a variety of roast meats” (The kingdom of fine cuisine, Navarre).
    http://www.turismo.navarra.es/eng/porque-navarra/razones/reyno+buena+mesa.htm

    “The house specialty is the T-bone steak, a chuletón” (Maribel’s Guide to the País Vasco).
    maribelsguides.com/mg_pais_vasco.pdf

    chuletón large steak, T-bone steak
    Collins Spanish Dictionary

    chuletón m T-bone steak
    Oxford Dictionary

    Deloris,
    As Felis Cañi said: "El diccionario puede decir misa."
    And that goes for all the references that you cited,
    because my information comes from first hand knowledge.

    I've eaten "chuletón" in Spain, specifically in the Basque Country,
    and I've eaten T-bone steaks in many places in the USA.
    I can assure you that they are not the same at all.

    What more can I tell you. Perhaps you can find another person who has eaten both of these steaks, and can voice his opinion.

    Meat cuts are quite different from country to country. It's very difficult to find a match from one country to another. In an effort towards completeness, many diccionaries and culinary references make an attempt to translate meat cuts as best as they can, and often without first hand knowledge.

    Regards and saludos.
     

    zumac

    Senior Member
    USA: English & Spanish
    Gee, duh, I guess that’s why they call it a “chuletón”— a whole cut of T-bone that hasn’t been carved into chuletas.

    So far, whole teams of lexicographers from major publishing houses have already been cited who define the word "chuletón" as "T-bone." And a search on the Net with the keywords "chuletón" and "T-bone steak" turns up at least 100 restaurant owners in Spain who are translating the "chuletón" on their own menus as "T-bone steak."

    ¡Por el amor de Dios! ¿Qué más puedes pedir?

    Bil,

    Your example of the 100 Spainsh restaurants who translate "chuletón" as "T-bone steak", is a classic. They already had "chuletón" on the menu, and now they want to list the equivalent in English. So they ask around and get a quick translation of "T-bone steak", which sounds good to them, because I'll bet you dollars to doughnuts that none of them ever had a T-bone steak in the USA. Ignorance is bliss. If an American ever comes into their restaurant and orders this so-called T-bone steak, he will be in for a surprise. Who knows, he may like this "chuletón", but it certainly won't be like a T-bone that he was expecting.

    Saludos.
     

    Perdido

    Senior Member
    EEUU
    ¡Jolín! No intentaba empezar una guerra. ¡Tranquilos, chicos!

    My two cents:

    The solomillo that I have eaten in Spain is like what we would call a filet mignon, not a mere sirloin. And I think the entrecots resembled a T-bone/porterhouse (same cut, different size). The chuletón I ate was not a T-bone. It was like the larger cut from which you take a filet mignon, which I think (and which seems to be supported by sunce's post) is the tenderloin.

    De ahí viene mi pregunta. Y, despues de tanta discusión, sigo inseguro.

    ¿Más opiniones?
     

    robjh22

    Senior Member
    U.S.A. & English
    No one has mentioned "porterhouse" yet. It may be what you are looking for.


    "The T-bone and Porterhouse are steak cuts of beef. They consist of a T-shaped bone with meat on each side. The larger side contains meat from the strip loin, whereas the smaller side contains the tenderloin. T-bone steaks from the rear end of the tenderloin contain a much larger section of the tenderloin, and are called porterhouse steaks. (in British usage, followed in Commonwealth countries, only the strip loin side is called the porterhouse, and the tenderloin side is called the fillet.)
    There is little agreement among experts on how large the tenderloin must be to call a T-bone a porterhouse; some steaks with a large tenderloin may be called a mere T-bone in some restaurants and steakhouses. However, there is general agreement the tenderloin can be no thinner than the diameter of a US quarter dollar coin (24.26 mm) to be classified as a porterhouse. The US Department of Agriculture's Institutional Meat Purchase Specifications states that the tenderloin must be at least 1.25 inches (32 mm) at its widest point for the steak to be classified a porterhouse. "


    Either way, the cow doesn't care much.
     

    Bil

    Banned
    English USA
    Bil,

    Your example of the 100 Spainsh restaurants who translate "chuletón" as "T-bone steak", is a classic. They already had "chuletón" on the menu, and now they want to list the equivalent in English. So they ask around and get a quick translation of "T-bone steak", which sounds good to them, because I'll bet you dollars to doughnuts that none of them ever had a T-bone steak in the USA. Ignorance is bliss. If an American ever comes into their restaurant and orders this so-called T-bone steak, he will be in for a surprise. Who knows, he may like this "chuletón", but it certainly won't be like a T-bone that he was expecting.

    Saludos.
    Oh, now I get it. So what you're saying is that the people who write dictionaries as well as the restaurant owners who prepare the product are ignorant with regard to the subject.

    Here's a just a handful of the menus from the world over written by naive restaurant owners:

    Chuletón de buey a la brasa con sal maldon (Grilled ox t-bone steak with maldon salt) — Restaurante Real, Almería.

    Chuletón Gallego (T-Bone-Steak) — Molí de Can Pere, Arenal.

    Chuleton. T-bone. £15.95 — La Rueda, London.

    Especial del a Casa
    Tenera de T Bone o Chuleton (grande) € 17.50 — Restaurante 121, Costa Blanca.

    chuleton de buey al plato caliente (T-bone steak on a hot plate) — Rincon de Curro, Cadiz.

    chuletón de ternera, veal T-bone steak — Parador de Ávila, Ávila.

    CHULETÓN, CHULETA T-bone Steak — Asador Goxoa, Bilbao.

    CHULETON DE BUEY A LA PARRILLA CON PIMIENTOS DEL PADRON Y TOMATE AL HORNO (price per weight) £15.96 per 500g
    Grilled northern Spanish T-bone steak served with padron peppers and cherry tomatoes on the vine — El Faro, London.

    CHULETÓN DE TERNERA 18,50 T-bone steak van 500 gr. — Los Ponchos, Belgium.

    Chuletón A La Moda De Buenos Aires
    T-bone steak, pasture fed, 500gsm, 750gsm or 1kg P.O.A. — Gaucho’s Argentinean Restaurant, Australia.

    Especialidades: chuletón de buey y chateaubriand a la piedra, pescados y mariscos frescos. Vinos de las mejores regiones de España.
    Specialities: T-bone steak, chateaubriand on the stone, fresh fish and seafood. Wines from the best regions in Spain. — Los Tamarindos, Puerto Alcúdia.

    chuletón (huge T-bone steak) — Pelotari, Madrid.

    Chuletón de Ternera del Condado (Sierra Morena/ Jaén) 24.60 E/ Kg T- Bone Steak from the Condado (Sierra Morena) — La Mesa Segureña, Cazorla.

    T.Bone Steack
    500 gramos del mejor chuletón al estilo Tejano, con patatas asadas. — Porto Pi, Palma de Mallorca.

    CHULETÓN DE TERNERA (+500 GR.) A LA PLANCHA MARINADO CON 19,0 BÁLSAMICO Y JENGIBRE, PATATAS DEL DÍA Grilled T-bone Steak (approx. 500 gr.) in Balsamic & Ginger Marinade Served with Potatoes of the Day — Los Dos Leones, Málaga

    Chuletón co Salsa de crema: T-Bone steak grilled and flamed in a rum and cream sauce
    Chuletón Al Jerez: T-Bone steak marinated in sherry and chilli. Flame grilled with garlic and mixed pepper sauce — Café Habana
     

    robjh22

    Senior Member
    U.S.A. & English
    No se diría "cutlet"??

    For some odd reason, we never hear "beef cutlet," though we do hear "veal cutlet" and less commonlu pork cutlet. I agree with you that there is little difference between a thin T-bone and a cutlet.

    p.s. Hey, Bil, we need more proof.
     

    Filis Cañí

    Banned
    Triana, caló

    Those look like (are) rib eye steaks with the bone in. I have also eaten chuletones and T-bone steaks, and they are not the same. All I can conclude about the dictionaries' blunders is that translators are paid very poorly and can't afford serious carnivorous research.

    (The restaurants that translate buey for ox could also be told that unless there's a famine we don't eat oxen, but steer.)
     

    mariposita

    Senior Member
    US, English
    I've eaten "chuletón" in Spain, specifically in the Basque Country,
    and I've eaten T-bone steaks in many places in the USA.
    I can assure you that they are not the same at all.

    What more can I tell you. Perhaps you can find another person who has eaten both of these steaks, and can voice his opinion.

    Meat cuts are quite different from country to country. It's very difficult to find a match from one country to another. In an effort towards completeness, many diccionaries and culinary references make an attempt to translate meat cuts as best as they can, and often without first hand knowledge.

    Regards and saludos.

    I've had both and agree. Chuletón encompasses several American cuts. It's huge--meant for two or three people to eat. It's not a mere t-bone. Because of the (incredible) flavor and texture, I have always thought that it included parts of ribeye and porterhouse. Nearly all of the beef cuts here in Spain are not directly equivalent to American cuts. The animal is butchered differently.
     

    Mate

    Senior Member
    Castellano - Argentina
    Buenos días/tardes a todos:

    En esta foto se ve un "t-bone steak". En el interior de la Argentina a este corte se lo llama "chuleta". En Buenos Aires, "bife angosto con lomo".

    Si rotamos la imagen en sentido horario, el trozo de carne que queda arriba es el bife angosto, bife de chorizo o "striploin" (longissimus dorsi). El que queda abajo es el lomo con cordón o "tenderloin" (psoas major + psoas minor).

    Si a la izquierda pegamos otro corte simétrico, veremos que en el centro queda un orificio: es el hueco por donde transcurre la médula espinal.

    Este corte no debe ser confundido con el bife ancho (con hueso) u ojo de bife (el mismo corte pero deshuesado), "rib eye" en inglés. Este último también es un corte tomado del dorso del animal pero más cerca de la cruz que los anteriores, que son más distales.

    No estoy seguro de la traducción correcta de "chuletón". Se me ocurre que es un nombre de fantasía que alude a una chuleta (t-bone steak) de gran espesor o cortada a partir de un novillo (steer) de 500kg o más, es decir, bastante grande. A mayor tamaño de animal, mayor es el "ojo" de los músculos dorsales.

    Tampoco estoy seguro de que esta sea información de primera mano ya que no he tenido la oportunidad de ver un chuletón en España y, como dije, en la Argentina no se usa esa denominación.

    Solo puedo agregar que soy veterinario desde hace 25 años, tengo restaurantes desde hace diez, y he exportado carne vacuna a Europa durante cuatro años. Mi función era supervisar los cortes en el frigorífico.

    Saludos - Mate
     

    Mate

    Senior Member
    Castellano - Argentina
    Lo que puedo decir es que, en efecto, la foto muestra un "bife de costilla", "bife ancho con hueso" o "rib eye steak".

    Es el corte que dije se hace de la parte más cercana a la cruz del animal.

    Como dato de interés puedo agregar que es muy apreciado en Francia, nuestro principal importador de dicho corte.
    Es de menor valor económico que los cortes que conforman el t-bone steak (strip loin & tenderloin), aunque esto es por una cuestión de demanda más que de calidad (en lo personal, es mi favorito).

    Lo que no puedo aseverar es que sea o no un chuletón, ya que, como dije en mi anterior post, "...no he tenido la oportunidad de ver un chuletón en España y, como dije, en la Argentina no se usa esa denominación."

    Saludos - Mate
     

    zumac

    Senior Member
    USA: English & Spanish
    Oh, now I get it. So what you're saying is that the people who write dictionaries as well as the restaurant owners who prepare the product are ignorant with regard to the subject.
    .....
    You got it right. They are ignorant with regard to this specific sibject, i.e., that "chuletón" is not a "T-bone steak." I suspect that they use this translation for expediency, and because others in the business have also used it.

    Jbruceismay has posted 1250 pictures of the "chuletón". For those of us that are familiar with the T-bone steak, these pictures do not correspond to a T-bone. There is one exception, there is one picture of a T-bone with a caption of "Chuletón hueso-..." which shows an actual T-bone. However, going to the site www.tiendaslatinas.com corresponding to the picture, there is a picture of a T-bone, but no mention of the Spanish name of Chuletón. Editorial liberties on the first picture, maybe?

    Subsecuently, Mateamargo posted a picture of a T-bone steak. Other pictures can also be found on the Internet. If you care to look, none of the T-bone pictures match those shown by Jbruceismay.

    In addition, both Felis Cañi and Mariposita agreed with my original statement that a Chuletón is not the same as a T-bone steak.

    In conclusion, we have seen photographic evidence plus the statements of several foreros who have eaten both the steaks in question. Is this not sufficient evidence, or will we continue to scout around the Internet for more erroneous translations?

    Saludos.
     

    Perdido

    Senior Member
    EEUU
    Well, well, the mods have been busy cleaning up.

    In any case, I am sure beyond the shadow of a doubt that the chuletón I ate was not a T-bone. However, according to this link, it was not a tenderloin either, although it is a similar-looking cut. The chart says it was a "rib steak (small end)," which I've never heard of in English either.

    Learn something new every day, I suppose.

    Gracias a todos por la ayuda.
     

    zumac

    Senior Member
    USA: English & Spanish
    Well, well, the mods have been busy cleaning up.

    In any case, I am sure beyond the shadow of a doubt that the chuletón I ate was not a T-bone. However, according to this link, it was not a tenderloin either, although it is a similar-looking cut. The chart says it was a "rib steak (small end)," which I've never heard of in English either.

    Learn something new every day, I suppose.

    Gracias a todos por la ayuda.

    Gracias a ti, Perdido, por tu paciencia.

    Lástima que al final de cuentas no hemos podido encontrar un traducción definitiva para chuletón en inglés. Lo más probable, como ya algunos aquí han dicho, es que el corte de carne del chuletón no se haga en países de habla inglés. Siendo este el caso, encontraremos cortes parecidos, pero no uno igual con nombre en inglés.

    Saludos cordiales.
     

    Deloris

    Banned
    English USA
    Hola. An accurate term for a “beyond-a-shadow-of-a-doubt non-T-bone” will most likely never be encountered in a language forum. However, Juan Manuel Pombo, Margarita Alonso, Victoria Romero-Cerro, María Jesús Fernández Prieto, Nazaret de Terán, Carol Styles Carvajal, Carlos López Beltán, Victoria Ordóñez Divi, María Luisa Chaves, Soraya Bermejo, Ana Cristina Llompart, Teresa Fuentes Peris, Beatriz Galimberti Jarman, Victoria Alonso Blanco, Clarisa Rucabado Butler, Carlos Villanueva, Margaret Jull Costa, Nieves Baranda, Francisco Segovia, Joseph Díaz, Carlos Cáceres, Pedro Cerrano, José Manuel Garnica, Ana María Postinger, María José Sánchez Blanco, José González, Lola Luengo, Sinda López Fuentes, Beatriz Oberländer, Nicola Richards, Luis Baqueriza, Soledad Pérez López, Pilar Jenkins, Isabel Carrera, María Jesús Vallejo Hernández, Isabel de Río-Sukan, Marta Giddings, Elena Giménez, Nancy Castillo, Cristina Rodríguez, Oscar Rodríguez Aguilar, Jose Antonio Sánchez, Joseph Gustaitis, Fiona Cordy, Roberto Rodríguez Saona, Ximena Castillo, Antonio Fortín, Cristina Lea, Carmen Fernández-Marsden, Virginia Masardo and Pilar Diego have all agreed that the word “chuletón” translates as “T-bone steak.”

    These are the names of the editorial staff who compile the Spanish dictionary at Oxford University Press. Their opinion, in turn, is corroborated by the publishers at Collins and Langenscheidt’s, whose interpretations likewise are supported by page after page of direct translations made by writers and restaurateurs from all over the world that are easily sourced on the Internet.

    Those who are disagreeing with the language authorities on this subject are offering neither an alternate translation nor a description that can be verified through published materials. It's hardly likely, moreover, that the world is going to begin dismissing dictionary definitions in response to what Zumac has for supper. Perhaps the meanderings encountered in this thread would be better suited under ‘Cultural Discussions’, or maybe a website forum exists where cuts-of-meat terminology shortcomings are debated.

    The DRAE, incidentally, hasn’t been particularly helpful in these deliberations:

    chuletón, na.
    —adj. Hond. homosexual (con tendencia a la homosexualidad). U. t. c. s.

    I think I’d rather just stick with the Oxford translation.
     

    Filis Cañí

    Banned
    Triana, caló
    I printed out this photo, which comes from the web page of a fancy restaurant in Spain, and this picture, which comes from the web page of a Spanish veterinarian, and went with them to my butcher's. He confirmed that both are the same cut, one with the bone and the other without, and that it is called what I have been saying all along: A RIB EYE STEAK.

    I'm sure that Bil and Deloris, using half the time they spent contradicting the obvious, will take care of spreading the news to all the dictionaries' editors.
     

    zumac

    Senior Member
    USA: English & Spanish
    I printed out this photo, which comes from the web page of a fancy reataurant in Spain, and this picture, which comes from the web page of a Spanish veterinarian, and went with them to my butcher's. He confirmed that both are the same cut, one with the bone and the other without, and that it is called what I have been saying all along: A RIB EYE STEAK.

    I'm sure that Bil and Deloris, using half the time they spent contradicting the obvious, will take care of spreading the news to all the dictionaries' editors.

    Filis,

    Your point leaves no doubt, and is absolutely "contundente".

    None of the long list of advocates for the translation to "T-bone steak", have shown any definitive evidence other than their names and laurels on which they rest.

    Thanks again, Filis.

    Saludos.
     

    mariposita

    Senior Member
    US, English
    The thing is, part of a chuletón is a rib eye, but a rib eye is never as big as a chuletón (at least in the US), so there is more to the steak than just that cut. But flavor and texture-wise it is closest to rib eye. In cases like this, I would leave the term in Spanish with a parenthetical explanation, something like this: chuletón (a XX ounce steak, similar to rib eye). Not mentioning the gargantuan size, does a disservice to the reader.

    Culinary translations in dictionaries are notoriously bad (I do food writing, so I know this first-hand). Gastronomy has its own jargon--like any highly refined cultural or scientific field. Spain has a very different gastronomic tradition and history from any Anglophone country, so there are bound to be major differences. Instead of offering accurate, but less concise translations, most dictionaries more often go for more pragmatic, general ones. And now I can see why. It seems that many don't accept that some things, ideas, cultural phenomena, etc. will never have an exact translation or one-word equivalent in another language or culture.

    Another egregious case of bad translations is with fish and shellfish. For example, there are four or five very different fish in Spain that get systematically translated as the ambiguous--and inaccurate--sea bass. The pervasiveness of this translation doesn't make it correct. When I am translating terms that pertain to sea creatures, greens, fruit, mushrooms or any other food item that is very specific to a particular geography, I always work from the Latin name. The dictionary is very often wrong or uses an umbrella term in English for what is a very specific term in Spanish.
     

    Filis Cañí

    Banned
    Triana, caló
    To get a big rib eye steak, all you need is a big cow. To quote my butcher: "My Dad used to cut rib eyes that big, but that was Down South, and they came from cows of over 2.500 pounds. We don't get that kind of steak around here." In Spain 1 kilo chuletones are not the norm either, they are more than anything a restaurant curiosity. I have always seen huge chuletones referred to as chuletones de Burgos.

    If a Spanish restauranteur wants to express both the cut and its size, I propose Down South Rib Eye Steak.
     

    mariposita

    Senior Member
    US, English
    To get a big rib eye steak, all you need is a big cow.

    That could be true. But when I bought rib-eyes (at the market or in a restaurant) in the US, a big one was usually around 12-16 ounces (340-450 grams). I've never seen a chuletón that small. I think what makes them different is the fact that the chuletón includes more of the fat and connecting tissue (which is good for flavor!). In the US, we tend to trim our steaks a lot more (and then age them and do all sorts of other things to improve the flavor).

    See these photos:
    Rib eye:
    http://whatscookingamerica.net/Beef/RibEyeSteak1.jpg
    http://www.londonbutcher.co.uk/images/Ribeye-steak.jpg

    Chuletón
    http://www.gastronomiavasca.net/glosario-file/164/Chuleton___Villagodio-thumbnail.jpg
    http://www.savannah-braseria.com/graf/CHULETON%20DE%20KILO.JPG


    From here on out, I will confidently translate chuletón as a big rib eye (for two). This thread is making me ridiculously hungry.
     

    zumac

    Senior Member
    USA: English & Spanish
    Mariposita,

    Although I am not the OP for this thread, I nevertheless would like to thank you and acknowledge all the contributions that you made.

    Best regards..... Zumac
     

    Sr. Moose

    Banned
    Frostbite Falls, Alces and English
    Aquí, Filis Cañi. Parece que hay por un lado una montaña de pruebas a favor de “T-bone steak” mientras que por el otro no tenemos nada más que esa foto de un ‘rib eye’, filete de costilla, y no un “chuletón”.

    Te da que pensar, ¿verdad?

    “… lamb (asados de cochinillo y cordero), as well as the famous chuletón de ternera, veal T-bone steak from Ávila” (Turespaña).
    http://www.spain.info/TourSpain/Destinos/TipoII/MasInfo/0/Avila.htm?Language=en

    Chuletón de ternera : Veal T-bone steak” (Cámara de Comercio e Industria).
    www.camarahuelva.com/PDF/Menu4Idiomas/Ingles.xls

    Chuletón de ternera hecho a leña 1Kg Aprox. 30,0€ mínimo 2 personas
    T-bone steak made in wood oven 1 kg minimum for 2 people” (PIZZERIA LUNAROSSA).
    http://www.pizzerialunarossa.com/secondi.html

    “The willow tree T.Bone (chuletón de Ternera Fresca)” (The Willow Tree, Costa Adeje, Tenerife).
    http://www.thewillowtree.es/nuestromenu.htm

    Chuletón de Ternera. T-Bone veal steak” (MENÚS EXTREMEÑOS).
    http://www.plasenciaweb.com/gredos/menu.htm
     

    mariposita

    Senior Member
    US, English
    Cada una de estas traducciones contiene otro error. Ternera no es lo mismo que "veal." Veal es ternera lechal. Pero como está en el diccionario (mal) encontrarás esta traducción en miles de cartas. Te aseguro que lo mismo pasa con chuletón.
     

    Sr. Moose

    Banned
    Frostbite Falls, Alces and English
    Cada una de estas traducciones contiene otro error. Ternera no es lo mismo que "veal." Veal es ternera lechal. Pero como está en el diccionario (mal) encontrarás esta traducción en miles de cartas. Te aseguro que lo mismo pasa con chuletón.
    ¿Puedes conseguirnos un documento de buena fuente que apoya tu opinión? Así se hace.
     

    mariposita

    Senior Member
    US, English
    Primero el chuletón es un corte tipicamente vasco (o castellano) de la parte del animal que se domina "el lomo alto." Esta página web es excelente para todo lo que se trata de la gastronomía vasca:

    definición:
    http://www.gastronomiavasca.net/hl/glosario/show-item?id=164&category_id=27

    mapa de la vaca:
    http://www.grupogastronomicogaditano.com/PartesVaca.jpg

    A ribeye proviene de la misma parte del animal:
    http://www.webefit.com/articles_100_199/ART_100_Img/Bull_Cuts.jpg

    A t-bone steak viene de la parte mas atrás--the short loin/sirloin.

    En cuanto a la distinción entre ternera lechal, ternera, añojo, novillo, vacuno mayor, buey, toro,etc. Esto sería otro hilo... Total, la palabra ternera se usa mucho en España como una denominación general para la carne de vaca. Veal es un término mucho más específico que refiere a un animal en sus primeros meses de vida alimentado exclusivamente con leche (ternera lechal).

    Pero, aparte de todo eso, la consideración principal es que chuletón es un corte de carne que casi siempre proviene de un animal mayor. Lo dice la pagina de la gastronomía vasca (vínculo más arriba), pero no hay que hacer nada más que ver el color rojo intenso y oscuro de la carne para saber que no se trata de un animal lechal, ni mucho menos. Por eso dije que veal es una mala traducción.

    Enfin, las cartas en España no representan una buena fuente para traductores buscando traducciones precisas--excepto si uno quiere reirse un poco (mi favorito: lengua estofada: stewed language).
     
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