ci-après nommé

  • Momerath

    Senior Member
    British English
    The expression is still widely used in EU regulations if nowhere else (try googling "'hereinafter called' eur lex"). Do you know what the Law Society recommends as an alternative, Keith?
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    Yes, see my #2. Or indeed any similar phrase in modern English - it's the absence of "hereinafter" that matters, not the adoption of any rigid alternative.

    Same applies to hereby, herewith, hereinbelow, hereinunder, hereintofore, wherewith... all of them long due for retirement.

    I sometimes despair of the translators in Brussels, who often don't appear to have read their own guidelines. (English style guide, European Commission Translation Service.)
     

    Momerath

    Senior Member
    British English
    Yes, see my #2. Or indeed any similar phrase in modern English - it's the absence of "hereinafter" that matters, not the adoption of any rigid alternative.
    Sorry, I don't know how I missed that. Even worse then "hereinafter" is the malapropistic "hereafter".
     

    bobepine

    Senior Member
    Canada, English & French
    It is also still widely used by the Government of Canada (try Googling hereinafter Canada and look for results on any gc.ca site). I have also seen it barely shortened to hereafter.
     

    Camis12

    Senior Member
    England, English
    In fact, it is also still widely used by UK and US lawyers (although Keith is right, we - in the UK at least - are supposed to be more plain). However, I usually don't see the "called". I would say the most common formulation in commercial contracts is

    XYZ ltd, having its registered office at wherever, with registered number 1, hereinafter "the Purchasor"

    I think "referred to below as" etc. are clumsy sounding, so I frequently take it out altogether and go for something like

    XYZ ltd, having its registered office at wherever, with registered number 1, (the "Purchasor")
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    ...XYZ ltd, having its registered office at wherever, with registered number 1, hereinafter "the Purchasor"
    I'm sure that you're correct in saying that this is often what we see (though perhaps with a capital "L" on Ltd. and Purchaser spelt with an "e"?) But is is right? It looks like word-for-word French to me.

    ... I frequently take it out altogether and go for something like:

    XYZ ltd, having its registered office at wherever, with registered number 1, (the "Purchasor")
    An elegant solution.
     
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