Cinderalla can't go to no ball

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amateurr

Senior Member
Russian
Claire: "Yoga, please if I'm ever going to get him back, it's now. I've got to go to that ball tonight, i've got to talk to him."
Yoga: "You a wanted felon. Cinderalla can't go to no ball."

Could you tell me what the statement might mean "Cinderalla can't go to no ball."
 
  • Portal

    New Member
    English & Russian
    This is a double negative, common in colloquial speech. I would say that the equivalent in standard English would be something like: "Cinderella cannot go to any ball." (As in, she is not the type of person who is allowed to go to balls.)
     

    MyAtomicGard3n

    Member
    English - Southern California
    This is a double negative, common in colloquial speech. I would say that the equivalent in standard English would be something like: "Cinderella cannot go to any ball." (As in, she is not the type of person who is allowed to go to balls.)
    I would agree in some situations the type of person would matter, but it can also be that her parents don't allow her to go, not so much she isn't the type of person who would usually go.

    "She can't go to no ball, she has work to do around the house"
     

    Tacocat

    Member
    United States - English
    Hello,
    It might also be helpful to note that this is a cultural reference. I hope that you are familiar with the fairy tale in which Cinderella, an orphan who lives with her stepmother and stepsisters and is treated unfairly and cruelly by them, decides to go to a ball at the palace so she can meet the prince, marry him, and escape her unhappy life. In the story, Cinderella makes the acquaintance of her fairy godmother, who gives the poor and poorly clothed girl a beautiful dress, other finery, and a carriage with white horses so that she may go to the ball and make a good impression on the prince; obviously, this is not a "realistic" situation.
    Therefore, "Cinderella can't go to no ball" means not only "You are a wanted felon, so you really shouldn't go out trying to do dangerous things, because you might be picked up by the police and sent to prison," but also "This is not a fairy tale, this real life, and your situation can't magically be resolved by an impulsive action like the one you are thinking of doing. You don't have a fairy godmother to come help you, so be realistic." There are a few layers of meaning to this phrase that would be unclear without cultural context.
    I hope this is helpful, too!
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    I would agree in some situations the type of person would matter, but it can also be that her parents don't allow her to go, not so much she isn't the type of person who would usually go.
    The sentences are: "You a wanted felon." Cinderella can't go to no ball".

    I don't think in this case that we need muddy the waters about parents prohibiting her from going to the ball.
     

    MyAtomicGard3n

    Member
    English - Southern California
    how about

    "tommy cant go to no basketball game, hes gots to wash the car"

    now in this sense, we dont have to worry about socio economic ladders.
     
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